Freud's Theory of the Psyche

Freud's Theory of the Psyche

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Freud's Theory of the Psyche introduction

Freud believed the mind was made up of three separate entities.

He believed that the ID, Ego and Superego were always in conflict and takes place in a person's unconscious.

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ID: Instincts

The ID is the instinctive aspect of the personality.

It demands immediate satisfaction and does not care about reality.

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Ego: Reality

The Ego is the logical aspect of the personality.

It can make conscious and rational decisions based on the demands of the ID, superego and the environment.

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Superego: Morality

The superego is the moral aspect of the personality.

It develops due to the moral and ethical restraints placed on us by our parents/caregivers.

It dictates our belief of right and wrong.

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Freud's Theory of the Psyche conclusion

The ID constantly wants satisfaction from food and sex.

The superego is the opposite and focuses on not having fun or feeling guilty about it.

The ego is the mediator who makes the decisions and tries to balance the ID and Superego.

Abnormality can develop when the superego is unable to control the superego or id, i.e. overactive id = aggressive.

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