English Lit

HideShow resource information

Rime of the Ancient Mariner - The Ancient Mariner

'long grey beard', 'glittering eye', 'bright-eyed mariner'

'skinny hand' - suffering from deprivation of nutrients.

'albatross around his neck' - God around his neck, punishment and guilt.

'I fear thee ancient mariner' - the wedding guest seemes frightened which reflects the audience's reactions.

Compared to sand 'as is the ribbed sea sand' - wrinkled and distorted.

'ancient' - supernatural elementof indicating the curse brings immortality and an overall superhuman.

1 of 22

Rime of the Ancient Mariner - The Wedding Guest

he is charcaterised through his fear 'beat his chest' worried for his well-being.

'cannot choose but hear' -under the spell of the mariner, hypnotised to the sound of his voice and tale.

he is an un-named charcater - but an immediate reference to religion; supposed to be attending a religious ceremony, the house of God.

'sadder and wiser man'

representative of the reader, reflects our thoughts and emotions.

2 of 22

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner - The albatross

'cross an Albatross...a Christian soul' - the religious symbolism and imagery of hope and relief; a sacred object in the sight of the mariner.

'God's name'.

'round it flew, the ice did split' - the albatross has proved to be a bird of good omen; the ship is able to move.

'I had done a hellish thing' - once the mariner had shot the ablbatross, he realises the task has resulted in negative imagery; knows it was sinful 'that bought the rain', 'the mist and fog', 'the bloody sun', 'idle as a painted ship'.

The death of the bird suggests the murder of 'jesus' which symbolises religion and nature.

3 of 22

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner - The Sailors

'they gave a groan' - supernatural, the sailors wake to help the mariner sail the ship, even though it was he who cursed them to death 'the helmsman steered, the ship moved on'.

Supernatural elements of an almost 'zombie' like quality. 'come back to life' in the night.

'the souls did form their bodies fly' - hteir souls leave the bodies, yet the bodies are left to rot and the eyes stare into the eyes of the mariner, wordlessly blaming and cursing him silently.

 The Ancient Mariner is destined to suffer the curse of a living death and continually be haunted by their cursing eyes.

4 of 22

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner - The Spirits

'what makes the ship drive on so fast?' asking questions that the reader may want to know, use of voice highlights the audiences questions of supernatural elements, voice of reasoning?

'mariners trance' - suggests they have hypnotised the mariner.

'dead men rise', 'troops of spirits' - the dead sailors sprirts have risen.

Two spirits, 'good v bad' - 'he loveth the man who loveth the bird', 'soft as honey-dew'.... 'still a slave before his land' a more judgmental voice of a spirits. Reasoning vs Prejudice.

5 of 22

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner - The Hermit

'the holy hermit' - presented as a religious aspect/ image/character

The reason of the re-telling of the story to the wedding guest - cursed him for eternity.

Hermit refers to the mariner as the 'devil' - complete opposite of God which the Hermit could be a representative of.

Lives within nature, a part of nature.

'he'll shrieve my soul' - the mariner believes that the Hermit will be able to clear himself and cleanse his soul of his dreadful sins.

6 of 22

The Great Gatsby - Nick

'my family...well to do people' - privilidged background, high section of society made him this judgmental?

Daisy - 'you remind me of  a rose' - morally intact, innocen on the exterior but 'inclinded to reserve all judgements' - thorns and jagged areas.

Mid-West - symbolic of moral values 'careless people', only one who eventually does care.

'engaged to a girl out West' - the comment of his past life (previous engagement) is some of the only information that th reader is given about Nick before his came to West Egg. This is an indication of a GAP of information within the novel (Nick's past).

7 of 22

The Great Gatsby - Gatsby

The main mystery of Gatsby, he is not officially introduced until chapter 3, his story introduced much later 'they thought he killed a man once' as it is delayed rumours start to emerge about this supposedly non existent Gatsby.

He created his own idetity, pioneered his own characteristics - made himself who he wants to be.

Trying to fit in 'old sport' sounds 'forced and unnatural' - he is a stranger in his society, always will be an outsider, not bought up into weath or the higher spectrum of society, he isolates himself away from the rest of the people he should inteact with.

He soundly represents the tragedy of the American Dream; it can never be achieved or accomplished, it really is just a 'dream', a nice fantasy.

8 of 22

The Great Gatsby - Myrtle Wilson

'thickish figure of a woman' - the opposite of Daisy, this is prehaps why Tom was intentionally attracted to her.

Aspires for a better life 'he wasnt fit to lick my shoes' - Wilson was always below her, critises her, why would she marry him in the first place, if she was of a 'higher class' than her, she is not able to relaise that she is also part of the working class, in which she and Wilson belong. She firmly believes she should stand higher - her confidence has been boosted due to being 'chosen' to be 'Tom's mistress'.

9 of 22

The Great Gatsby - Tom

'drift forever' - uncommitted and doesnt take any responsibility in his actions or the consequences that resluts from these actions.

'seeking the dramatic turbulance' - refering to how successful he was in his early life when he attended YALE for football and physical eduction, everything since then has been an anticlimax for Tom, nothing will compare to those years when he was at his peak of life.

10 of 22

The Great Gatsby - George Wilson

George is presented as loyal, self-working and selfless.

'He's so dumb he dont know hes alive' - presented sympathetically as a victim of the selfish materialism in the East.

Seems to be besotted with his wife, but she treats him 'as if he were a ghost' -showing how he could be classified as a weak and an almost background character. 'he thinks she's going to see her sister in New York' - easily manipulated and passive.

Tom used him to clear up his mess after Gatsby's death 'he was crazy enough to kill me... i told him the truth' .

11 of 22

Christina Rossetti Poetry (Goblin Market) - Lizzie

The heroine of the story; wants the very best for her sister and tries to protect where it is possible 'tender Lizzie'; youthful and caring.

'white and golden Lizzie stood' - purity and virginity and also richness, the colour gold is an empowering colour, it can also indicate strength and wealth, by having her virginity.

'Lizzie uttered not a word' - stoic struggle in her attempt to assist her sister, the resistance shows that she is the strenth of their relationship.

Empowered 'worn out by her resistance' - physical onslaught to attempt to revive and help to her maximum ability.

Warning tone of her voice throughout 'covered her eyes', 'full of wise upbraidings', 'the twilight is not good for maidens' - can sense danger and her didactic tone warns the reader of upcoming climaxes.

12 of 22

Christina Rossetti Poetry (Goblin Market) - Laura

'her golden head', 'maid', 'bowed her head'.

'Laura in an absent dream' addicted to the fruit, captivated by her cravings, unable to escape the rich temptations.

'tender feet' - vulnerability.

'Laura most like a leaping flame' - contrast to Lizzie's 'lily', 'swan' characterisation, but also her with and without the fruit ecstacy. Fire is dangerous and out of control, suggesting her reactions to the fruit consumptions.

Lizzie - 'her sister's cancerous care' - how her cravng of the fruit makes her physcologically weak.

'Laura turned as still as stone' - the fruit fluctuates her physicall appearence and is adapted through the fruit.

'sweet toothed Laura', 'Laura dwindling', 'knocking at death's door.'

13 of 22

Christina Rossetti (Goblin Market) - Goblins

Presented as 'creature-like', emphasis on an inhuman structure and physique; animals are out of control and wild 'hobbling down the glen' - deformed.

'whiskars' ,'tail'

Goblins are associated with the darkness of the night, the forest where evil lurks and preys ' evening by evening', 'dew not fallen''

'coaxed her, pinched her, fought her' - aggresive verbs and vocabulary used by and and to describe the Goblins is an indication of how they are used to getting what they want and will stop at no means to retreive their desperation and wants.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

'

14 of 22

Narrative explained..

Involves how the events and causes are shown, and the various methods used to do this showing. Exploring aspects of narrative involves looking at what the writer has chosen to include and not include, and how this choice leads to the reader to certain conclusions.

15 of 22

The building blocks of narrative...

  • Scenes and place - This refers to where the action is set, and it's significance beyond being just a place where something happens.
  • Time and sequence - The order in which events are shown is a key part of how narrative works. While time in the real work is represented by clocks and calendars that tick over at the same time at a regula\r rate, time in stories is manipulated that some points in time go slowly, and others accelerate and others are missed out completely.
  • Characters - Characters in this sense refers not only to the people in the story, but much more importantly tot heir character traits and how they are revealed. Minor characters can also be significant.
  • Voices - One way to retrieve information in the story is through what we are 'told' by characters involved. They can help to establish character traits, and so are part of characterisation, but they also enable authors to give information.
  • Point of view -  This term is used to help with the idea that a story is told from a certain standpoint or perspective.
  • Destination - In working out that the story has moral messages, ideas that we are expected to believe in, we can see that the ideology of the story needs to be uncovered and explored.
16 of 22

Characterisation

  • People in stories - When  looking at aspects of narrative, you are not concerned with the characters as such, but with aspects of characterisation. Remining the reader that a character is not real, does not actually exist outside the confines of the novel or poem, reminds you that you are looking at how the authors achieve effects.
  • Starting with a name - The process of significationis a cultural one. The meanings and accosiations we find in names are implied by the author and understood by those readers who have enough knowledge of culture to make the connections.
  • Appearance - The phsical appearance of a character can say a great deal about them; what they look like, how they dress, their physical gestures. They are usually described early on as to establish them within the text.
17 of 22

Voices

  • Direct speech - the actual words spoken by characters in a narrative.
  • Attributed - describes direct speech that is identified ( the reader is told who is speaking).
  • Free - in a technical sense, describes thought or speech that is not attributed ( the reader is not told specifically who is speaking or thinking).
  • Homodiegetic narrator - the narrator who is part of the story they describe.
  • Intadiegetic narrator - the narrator who is not omniscient and does not know everything , usually because they are part of the story rather than in control of it.
  • Indirect speech - speech that is reported by the narrator, giving a version of the words rather than the words themselves.
18 of 22

ROAM - Setting

Outside of the church 'Bridegroom's doors open wide' - religious ceremony represents the religious aspects within the story ; ironic.

The mystical sea 'glossy green and velvet black' - representative of the creatures that the mariner swears he sees 'moved in tracks of shining white'.

The deathly sea that was a result of the curse 'water water everywhere... nor any drop to drink' 'never a breeze did breathe'.

19 of 22

The Great Gatsby - Setting

The West Egg V The East Egg - the social divide between new money and old money.

The East Egg - The East Egg is where Daisy and Tom Buchanan live as they are born out of old money ( they come from many generations of wealth).

The West Egg - Gatsby and Nick are new money ( they earned their own money or their parents earned it ) as so therefore they are situated on West Egg.

The Valley of Ashes - consists of a long stretch of desolate land created by the dumping of industrial ashes. It represents the moral and social decay that results from the uninhibited pursuit of wealth, as the rich indulge themselves with regard for nothing but their own pleasure.

New York - An area where consumerism and materialism is the main reasion that attracts Myrtle; a place where morals are allowed to be broken, Myrtle goes here to escape the disperity of The valley of ashes.

20 of 22

The Great Gatsby - Setting

The West Egg V The East Egg - the social divide between new money and old money.

The East Egg - The East Egg is where Daisy and Tom Buchanan live as they are born out of old money ( they come from many generations of wealth).

The West Egg - Gatsby and Nick are new money ( they earned their own money or their parents earned it ) as so therefore they are situated on West Egg.

The Valley of Ashes - consists of a long stretch of desolate land created by the dumping of industrial ashes. It represents the moral and social decay that results from the uninhibited pursuit of wealth, as the rich indulge themselves with regard for nothing but their own pleasure.

New York - An area where consumerism and materialism is the main reasion that attracts Myrtle; a place where morals are allowed to be broken, Myrtle goes here to escape the disperity of The valley of ashes.

21 of 22

The Goblin Market - Setting

Goblin Market" seems to take place in some kind of fantasy parallel universe with several important differences from our own world. First of all, there are goblins, and they have a traveling fruit market.

Other than the fruit-peddling goblins and the distinct lack of human men, though, the world of "Goblin Market" looks an awful lot like an idyllic English countryside. There are lots of fresh flowers, cows to milk, chickens to feed, babbling brooks and meadows…

So many temptuous fruits that try and and tempt the young girls to try and eat the fruit.

22 of 22

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar English Literature resources:

See all English Literature resources »See all resources »