Death of the King's Horseman Overview

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  • Death and the King's Horseman Overview
    • Scene 1
      • Drums - upbeat and celebratory
      • Brightly lit
      • Vibrant/rich colours
      • Busy and lively
      • We meet Elesin and the Praise Singer
        • In high spirits
        • Praise singer is worried/ concerned for him
        • Elesin compares the Praise singer to a "jealous wife"
      • We then meet Iyaloja - the "mother of the market" and the "mother of multitudes"
        • Has some power when talking to Elesin
        • Warns him about the marriage
          • Foreshadows the rest of the play
          • Sacrifices her daughter-in-law for him
      • "Object" is his bride - his final gift
        • Warns him about the marriage
          • Foreshadows the rest of the play
          • Sacrifices her daughter-in-law for him
      • "Women" - concerned about insulting him
        • "mortify the gods"
      • "Prepare yourself" - for marriage / what he has to do
      • Section ends on "preparation" - two meanings
    • Scene 2
      • Bungalow at the Pilkings - Simon and Jane (couple)
      • Dancing the tango on the veranda - difference to the music and dance at the market place in the egungun costumes
        • Channel to the ancestors, should be repected
      • Amusa (Native administration police officer - converted)
        • Patronise and belittle him
          • "mumbo jumbo"
          • "nonsense"
        • Amuse is frightened of the egungun costume and tried to wam them about what it means - but they don't listen
          • Tells them of news of ritual suicide however they think its barbaric and must be stopped
      • They care about going to the ball and seeing the prince
      • There is a misunders- tanding/ lack of wanting to understand
      • "stamped it all out but its lucking under the surface somewhere" find it a problem - petty
      • At the end of the scene they pretend that nothing has happened
      • Joseph - their servant who originally was Yoruban but converted to Christianity
        • Although he converted they care nothing for what he did
        • "I forgot you were still there"
    • Scene 3
      • All about the women and the girls
      • Amusa sent to arrest Elesin
        • Made fun of by the women and girls
        • Emasculate him
        • "White man's enuch
        • Women are empowered
      • Iyaloja arrives and warns Amusa to leave
      • Trying to gain power but taunted
      • Girls get involved
        • Education - something the "white man" bring
        • Use what they have been talk to mock Amusa and the "white man"
        • British role play - using advanced English Language
      • Elesin arrives after marriage - he is very pround while his wife is nervous
      • Elesin begins his trance suicide accompanied by the praise singer - asks Elesin to be remembered
      • Beginning of the praise singers grief - overcome with emotion
      • "Light fades out slowly onto the scene
    • Scene 4
      • "tawdry decadance"
      • Prince
      • Fancy Dress Ball - Plikings showing off the egungun
        • Lack of respect
        • Find out that Amusa has failed
        • Jane warns Simon to be careful
      • Meet Olunde - Elesin's son
      • Olunde has returned from England
        • "little respect for what you don't understand"
        • "You think that everything that matters comes from you"
      • Respects Yoruban tradition
      • Jane thinks Olunde is callous and unfeeling
      • "I have no father, eater of leftovers
        • Elesin arrives / captured
        • Shamed
        • Dishonoured
      • "Elesin, sobbing into the ground
    • Scene 5
      • "iron barned gate"
        • Wrists encased in metal braclet
        • Links to slavery
      • Shows have "barbaric" they are precieved to be
      • Pilkings and Elesin confront each other
        • "Ghostly one" - misunderstanding of duty
      • Learn about Elesin's weakness - blames bride, white man and the gods
      • Iyaloja arives with women and praise
      • Dirge - contrast the misic at the beginning
      • Iyaloja is scornful, turns back on him
      • Elesin learns of Olunde's sacrifice - shamed further and kills himself with the chains
        • Frees himself - ironic
      • Ends on two women
      • "Hence teh burdon I bring to lay beyond your gates"

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