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Information taken from BBC Bitesize
25/05/2011…read more

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Design & Technology
Materials
The material types used in D&T Resistant Materials are woods, metals, plastics, ceramics and
composites. Each of these has its own characteristic working properties such as strength,
malleability, conductivity, toughness and durability.
Types of materials
You need to be familiar with the different properties of ferrous and nonferrous metals softwood
and hardwood timbers and thermoplastics and thermoset plastics.
When working with resistant materials you need to be able to choose the best material for a job.…read more

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Plasics are divided into thermoset plastics and thermoplastics. The main difference between the
two is that thermoplastics can be heated and shaped many times, while thermoset plastics can only
be heated and shaped once.
Composite materials
Composite materials are formed by combining and bonding two or more materials a reinforcing
material and a bonding agent such as glue.…read more

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The ability of a material to conduct heat or electrical energy.
Strength
The ability of a material to withstand a force without breaking or bending.
Elasticity
The ability of a material to bend and then to return to its orginal shape and size.
Plasticity
The ability of a material to permanently change in shape.
Malleability
The ability of a material to permanently deform [deform: lose or change its shape ] in all directions
without cracking.…read more

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Timbers
There are two types of timber: softwood and hardwood.
Softwood timbers usually come from coniferous trees that is, evergreen, needleleaved,
conebearing trees such as fir and pine. They do not have the hard cell structure that gives
hardwood trees their name.
Hardwood timbers come from broadleaved, deciduous trees, and are more important in Design
and Technology than softwood timbers. The main hardwood timbers are ash, beech, birch, cherry,
elm, iroko, mahogany, meranti, oak, obeche, sapele and teak.…read more

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Safety during the making of the product
A laboratory
To ensure safety during making, a designer needs to consider the following:
Will any of the materials specified cause harm to the maker?
Will any of the processes to be used cause harm to the maker?
Will any of the finishing techniques used cause harm to the maker?
Safety of the product when it is used
A safety belt
To ensure safety of the product when it is used, the designer needs to consider the following:…read more

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A rubbish tip
To ensure safety when a product is disposed of, a designer needs to consider the following:
Can the component parts and different materials be dismantled without harm?
Will dismantling result in the release of toxic or harmful substances?
Will recycling materials, eg melting down, cause release of toxic or harmful substances?
Working safely
All those involved in the making of products have a responsibility to use safe working techniques
in order to avoid harm to themselves or to others.…read more

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When using equipment, personal protective equipment should be used, including by
other workers nearby if necessary. All guards and other protective devices should be in place at all
times when the equipment is in use.
Materials, chemicals, finishes and solvents
Toxic symbol
Materials must be stored so that sharp edges and ends cannot cause harm. Gloves should be used
when handling materials with sharp edges. All chemicals, finishes and solvents should be stored
correctly in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions.…read more

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