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SOCIAL GROUPS AND RELIGIOSITY
Different social groups vary in their religious participations as they may
hold different beliefs to one another.
These social groups may differ in their religiosity because of their social
class, gender, ethnicity and even age.…read more

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AGE AND RELIGIOUS PARTICIPATION
The general pattern we
expect and predict is that
the older a person is, the
more likely they are to
attend religious services.
However statistics from the 2005 English Church Census
carried out by the Christian research association
contradicted these expected results.…read more

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Results from the survey showed
two clear distinctions
1. The under 15 attended
church more often as they
were younger and forced to
come by there parents.
2. The 65 and over attended
church less as they were most
likely to be sick or disabled so
unable to attend church.…read more

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Voas & Crockett (2005)
REASONS FOR AGE DIFFERENCES IN RELIGIOUS PARTICIPATION
According to Voas & Crockett there are two
main explanations for age differences.
1. The Ageing effect
People turn to religion as they get older. As they
approach death, they naturally become more
concerned about spiritual matters the after life.
2. The Generations effect
Due to increase rates in secularisation, religion
becomes less popular with each new
generation. Therefore it is not that old people
are more religious because they approach
death but simply because they were brought up
at a time where religion was much popular.…read more

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COULD SECULARISATION BE ON A CONSTANT RISE?
· Voas & Crockett concluded from the English Church census that the
Generation affect is more significant that the ageing effect and
predicts that each generation will be half as religious as its parents
as it is clear that the young will be less and less willing to attend.
Since 1979 the number of churchgoers aged 15- 19 has fallen
sharply from 490 to 153.
· Gill (1998) notes children are no longer receiving a religious
socialisation and are more commonly brought up with out religious
beliefs, so it is likely that within two - three generations, Churchgoers
could only be a small minority.…read more

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