model of persuation

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: mina
  • Created on: 23-12-12 07:24
Preview of model of persuation

First 451 words of the document:

APPLYING the HovlandYale Model
Outline the Hovland Yale model of persuasion. Explain how a mobile phone company
might use knowledge of this model in a campaign to market a new phone.
Explain how the strategy persuades:
The strategy persuades by attitude change by sequential process. The first stage is attentionthe
individual must notice the attempt to persuade them. The second stagecomprehension the persons
need to understand the message. Third stagereactance, the individual will react to the message, either
with broad agreement or dispute is as a load of rubbish. Acceptancethe message will only be accepted
if believed. The model argues that it is dependant on several factors such as source ](who is doing the
persuading), e.g. credibility people are more likely to be persuaded by a credible or expert
source[Hovland and Weiss], physical appearance physically attractive sources are more persuasive
then less attractive sources [Kiesler and Kiesler] speed of speechrapid speakers are more persuasive
than slow speakers, message (the content of what is said),e.g. contentmessages which are not
deliberately targeted at us are more persuasive [walster and festinger] or fear ­ persuasion can be
increased by fearful messages, but large amount of fear can switch people off [meyerowitz and
chaiken], medium (how it is put across) e.g. written messages/audio visual messagesaudio messages
are more persuasive than written messages especially if the message is simple. Written messages are
better if processing effort is required [chaiken and eagly] and target (the person who is being
persuaded), e.g. self esteem people with lower self esteem are easier to persuade than those with
higher selfesteem [jains]
Credible source e.g. scientist prior knowledge that we can trust
= not biased avoid questioning about the
Use of mobile phones being unhealthy
source Usain Bolt ­ internet speed of mobile phone
Well known (attention) trust as the celebrity will not
wish their own reputation damaged.
EVALUATION OF the HovlandYale Model
Individual differences in audience effects
Major criticism is that the theory it suggests that people think rationally and weight up things carefully.
But we might be cognitive misers meaning we take shortcuts so we don't weight up an arguments we
just think emotionally (e.g. choosing a pizza to order).
Age as an audience effect
Evidence supporting the `life changes' hypothesis comes from Rutland's attitudes in children. He
questioned 329 children in a photograph evaluation task. National prejudice and group favoritism were
not apparent in young children, but merged at age 12, reaching a peak at age 16.

Other pages in this set

Page 2

Preview of page 2

Here's a taster:

APPLYING the Elaboration Likelihood Model
DEPENDS ON SOMEONE'S MOTIVATION / ABILITY TO ELABORATE
ELABORATE MEANS....MENTAL EFFORT
ELM WILL DEPEND ON FACTORS INCLUDING...
Explain how a mobile phone company might use knowledge of this model in a
campaign to market a new phone.
IF ELM IS HIGH USE...Central Route
WHEN? Intelligent audience / facts / High need for cognition / permanent change / prior knowledge /
interest / amount of time available (reasonable)
STRATEGIES Explain how the strategy persuades
IF ELM IS LOW USE...…read more

Page 3

Preview of page 3

Here's a taster:

COGNITIVE CONSISTENCY/DISSONANCE AND SELFPERCEPTION
how to motivate someone to change their attitudes
THEORY 1 COGNITIVE DISSONANCE THEORY…read more

Page 4

Preview of page 4

Here's a taster:

Festinger makes THREE assumptions
1
2
3
Dissonance means...
Dissonance is created when...
Human beings motivated to reduce dissonance.
Three ways to eliminate dissonance
1
2
3
Dissonance theory shows that our attitudes make us select what we pay attention to on the
media ­ which is why it is difficult to persuade us to change our attitudes because...…read more

Page 5

Preview of page 5

Here's a taster:

Our own perception of ourselves influences our attitudes not our consistent or inconsistent
attitudes. Do we always know our attitudes, afterall.…read more

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »See all resources »