Slides in this set

Slide 1

Preview of page 1

A01, A02, A03
Sian Doran - Revision Notes…read more

Slide 2

Preview of page 2

Maude Clare
Sian Doran - Revision Notes…read more

Slide 3

Preview of page 3

Extra-diegetic Narrator
The heterodiegtic narrator is Out of the church she followed them
omniscient and seems to be With a lofty step and mien:
looking over the characters in the His bride was like a village maid,
poem. This creates the Maude Clare was like a queen.
impression that the story told is `Son Thomas,' his lady mother said,
not a personal account but With smiles, almost with tears:
instead, is a nonfiction text, which `May Nell and you but live as true
is then told in the form of story. As we have done for years;
(narrativization)
This is done through the use of the pronouns `she'
and `his' as they are impersonal and without a
specific connection to a character, thus showing
how the narrator isn't involved directly with the
narratives diegesis. It's unclear as to why Rossetti
has chosen to employ this technique ­ perhaps she
feels it allows her to make the messages more
universal it's not clouded with judgment and
opinions.
Sian Doran - Revision Notes…read more

Slide 4

Preview of page 4

Narrative Gaps
As a reader we are left with no
supplementary details of Nell nor
Maude; we are just informed that
Maude has a higher social status and
presence than Nell.
Out of the church she followed them
With a lofty step and mien:
His bride was like a village maid,
Maude Clare was like a queen.
`Son Thomas,' his lady mother said,
With smiles, almost with tears:
`May Nell and you but live as true
As we have done for years;
The narrator diverts the plot of the story, by
introducing the Lord's mother, thus leaving the
reader with a gap in the narrative. This changes the
pace of the story, leaving the reader in suspense.
What is the relationship between the 3? Maude's
intensions? Maude's real identity?
Sian Doran - Revision Notes…read more

Slide 5

Preview of page 5

Analepsis
In this case, Rossetti's use of
analepsis creates a crux in the
narrative. Although it is a `flash back'
in which Thomas's mother is `Your father thirty years ago
reminiscent on her own marriage, it Had just your tale to tell;
conveys the idea of a secret. But he was not so pale as you,
Nor I so pale as Nell.'
-Stanza 2
Sian Doran - Revision Notes…read more

Slide 6

Preview of page 6

Reported Speech
The majority of the poem is reported `Son Thomas,' his lady mother said
speech. Similarly to the use of an extra- - Stanza 1
diegetic narrator, the use of reported
speech eludes to the fact that speaker `Lo, I have brought my gift, my lord, Have brought my gift,'
had no real connection with the story, she said:
and that they're simply recounting an - Stanza 4
event that occurred. It also creates the
impression that the speaker is an `And what you leave,' said Nell
impartial member of the story ensuring - Stanza 10
that the narration is not subjective.
However it's yet another gap...who is
the narrator?
All the action that takes place throughout the poem seem to arise from the
diction by the characters.
`She turned to Nell: `My Lady Nell,
I have a gift for you;
Though, were it fruit, the bloom were gone,
Or, were it flowers, the dew.'
Links to imagery. This `gift' could be taken in two ways, either it's Maude
being spiteful of Nell's new status; she's not over Thomas and is bitter that
he has moved on. Alternatively, could be implying a moral message ­ Nell
shouldn't fall into Thomas's trap, `the bloom were gone' suggests that their
marriage will inevitability fail because men use women.Sian Doran - Revision Notes…read more

Slide 7

Preview of page 7
Preview of page 7

Slide 8

Preview of page 8
Preview of page 8

Slide 9

Preview of page 9
Preview of page 9

Slide 10

Preview of page 10
Preview of page 10

Comments

Dla2lag

Report

A thorough analysis of the two poems making relevant and interesting points. A great resource for challenging your own understanding and analysis of the poem and very helpful for identifying points that need to be made to reach the top grades.

Similar English Literature resources:

See all English Literature resources »See all resources »