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Key Words

Legislature ­ The name given to the political institution whose main role is to pass laws. In the UK this is
Parliament, in the USA congress etc. This does not necessarily mean that the legislature develops the laws, but
that the laws are only legitimate if passed by…

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Opposition ­ This applies only to the parties that do not make up government. Although it is more of a ritualised
process, it still plays an important role. It is expected that parliamentary politics will be adversarial meaning it
expects to be robustly challenged in Parliament. This ensures the government…

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The Commons is dominated by the executive and therefore not independent.
It is difficult for MPs to gather enough support to force through a bill.

Delaying and amendments

The Parliament Act limits this to power to one year.
Proposed Lords' amendments must be approved by the Commons where government dominates.…

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The nature of parliamentary sovereignty

The UK Parliament is said to be legally sovereign, meaning

Parliament is the source of all political power. No body may exercise power unless granted by
Parliament, but it does delegate power through devolution and local authorities/courts.
Parliament may restore to itself any powers that…

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FULLY APPOINTED SECOND CHAMBER
Arguments For
Arguments Against
It is an opportunity to bring people into the political It could put too much power into the hands of those
process that would not wish to stand for election. responsible for appointing members and could lead to
corruption.
Membership can be…

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In the House of Lords, external groups are particularly active when legislative amendments are being made. As
most peers are not strongly pinned down by party discipline, may see their role in terms of protecting minority
interests. In this process, representation on interests can be seen at its most intense.…

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