Gee Walker and Gordon Wilson

Two examples of how people cope with suffering

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Gordon Wilson
Gordon Wilson held his daughter's hand as they lay trapped beneath a mountain of
rubble.
It was 1987, and he and Marie had been standing watching a peaceful Remembrance
Day service in Enniskillen, Northern Ireland, when a terrorist bomb went off. The
rescuers dug them out of the rubble and rushed them to hospital. But, by the end of
the day, Marie and nine other people were dead.
A few hours after the bombing, when interviewed by the BBC, Gordon Wilson
forgave the terrorists who had killed his daughter. He said that he would pray for
them. He also begged that no-one took revenge for Marie's death. "That", he said,
"will not bring her back."
The loss of Marie shattered Gordon Wilson and his wife Joan, but, they were anxious
that bitterness and hatred should not rip apart the small town of Enniskillen. Before
the bomb, Protestants and Catholics in Enniskillen had lived side by side, and the
Wilsons wanted it to stay that way.
The bomb had done a lot of damage, not just to the buildings in the town but in the
relationships between Catholics and Protestants. As Christians, the Wilson wanted to
help repair this damage between people.
Gee Walker
Anthony Walker died in a racially motivated attack in July 2005. His mother Gee
Walker has since become well known and respected both for her dignity in dealing
with her son's death and the support she now provides to a variety of groups and
communities in the UK in particular in Merseyside.
Gee is a strong advocate for forgiveness of her son's killers and believes that all
children should be educated and supported in order that they are able to realise their
potential becoming active citizens in strong communities which embrace diversity.
The Anthony Walker Foundation established by the family stands for Diversity,
Integrity, and Racial harmony through sport, music and education.

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