Unit 7 - Meeting Individual Needs Mindmap

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  • Unit 7: Meeting Individual Needs
    • Care Planning
      • Care planning cycle: A cycle used by care practitioners to produce and implement individualised care plans that aim to meet the specific needs of an individual.
        • 1) Holistic assessment
          • 2) Planning
            • 3) Implementing the plan
              • 4) Monitoring the plan
                • 5) Review & evaluate the plan given
          • A holistic assessment is an assessment that focuses on the whole person rather than a specific or partial aspect of their functioning.
          • The assessment process changed since the 1990 Community Care Act due to increasing demands on the service (e.g. elderly people).
            • Social services have had to develop criteria which determine who will receive care services and how these will be delivered.
      • Care Planning involves the individuals needs being identified, assessed and addressed.
      • The process of care planning occurs through the service user and the care provider.
      • A care plan is a procedure set up to outline and record a course of care, treatment or therapy between professional workers and service users and their carers.
      • Why use a care planning process?
        • Recognises individuals needs
        • It's likely to target priority needs
        • Increases the consistency and efficiency of care needs
        • Ensures all care interventions remain effective
        • Its used as a source of information by all professionals
    • Legislation
      • Strengths
        • Makes people accountable
        • Gives a framework for policies and procedures
        • Promotes good quality care
      • Weaknessess
        • People might not follow it (compliance)
          • Some people may not understand the legislation e.g. due to language reasons
        • The legislation may not be accurate or correct
        • Its difficult to monitor whether or not the legislation is being enforced
      • Examples of legislation...
        • The Children Act (1989)
          • This is the most important piece of legislation currently affecting the provision of care services for children
          • Paramountcy principle - the child is considered the most important thing in any decisions being made
          • The parents of the children 'in need' should be given the help and support they need to look after their children
          • Children in danger should be kept safe and be protected by effective intervention
          • Children should be consulted about decisions affecting their future and should be kept informed about what happens to them
          • Who does the Children Act affect..?
            • Foster carers
            • Parents
            • Teaching staff
            • Residential care workers
        • The Mental Health Act (1983)
          • People who are experiencing a mental disorder are a key group who require legal protection as they are vulnerable
          • It lays down the rules for compulsory admission to hospital if a person with mental illness poses a risk to the health and safety of themselves and/or others.
          • Cre providers such as hospitals are expected to follow the mental health code of practice
          • Members of the Mental Health Commission regularly visit the hospital where patients are detained under the act and offer all patients the chance to meet with them and discuss their care
        • The Disability Discrimination Act (1995)
          • The DDA was passed to end long term discrimination against disabled people in...
            • Employment
            • Access to goods, facilities and services
            • The management, buying or renting of land or property
            • Education
          • The Act makes it unlawful for a provider of services to treat disabled people less favourably than other people
          • Care organisations and practitioners working with disabled people now have to ensure that they work in ways that respect the rights of disabled people
        • Human Rights Act (1998)
          • Aim: to achieve a fair balance between the public interest and the individuals rights.
          • Examples of clients rights under the Human Rights Act...
            • Right to liberty
            • Right to freedom from unfair discrimination
            • Right to marry and start a family
            • Right to life
        • NHS and Community Care Act (1990)
          • Made changes which affected both the structure and practice of HSC
    • Mixed Economy of Care
      • This is a care system that combines public (government), private, voluntary and informal sector provision. Each of these types of care is funded in a different way - hence the term mixed economy
      • Increases effectiveness and the quality of the service
      • Advantages
        • Choice for service users
        • More responsive to needs
        • Flexible
        • Cost effective
      • Disadvantages
        • Not always cost effective
        • Two tier system
        • Uneven - more services may be located in some areas
      • Current provision of care
        • National - Government
        • Regional - Strategic Health Authorities
          • They develop strategies for health services and manage the NHS trusts in their area
          • There are 28 strategic health authorities in England, responsible for the health of the population in their area
        • Local - Primary Care Trusts, NHS Trusts
          • Primary Care Trusts have developed to provide a range of services to the community
            • Their role is to assess and meet local health needs
              • Control 75% of NHS budget
            • Provided by GPs, dentists, opticians etc
    • Care Sectors
      • Statutory
        • Care that is provided by law. A person has a statutory (legal) right to receive it
          • Typically funded by the government
            • Usually funded by a public care organisation e.g. NHS
              • Usually free for those who are entitled for services. Some people are liable for charges
      • Private (independent)
        • Care services provided to people who are willing to pay for it
          • Funded by direct client payment or by a client taking out health care insurance
            • Usually provided by a private practitioner or care business e.g. Bupa
              • Available to anyone who can pay for it
      • Voluntary (independent)
        • Care services provided free of charge or for a small subsidised fee - by not for profit making organisations
          • Usually provided by not for profit organisations such as Mind, Age Concern
            • Available to those who meet the eligibility requirements
      • Informal
        • Care that is provided bt relatives and friends on an unpaid basis, outside of the professional care system
          • Usually funded by government grants
            • Usually provided by a partner, relative or friend of a person in need of care
              • Available to those who have people able to care for them
                • Care is typically practical, personal and non technical forms of help and support
    • Organisational culture
      • Organisational culture is the values, beliefs and norms of a specific organisation which shape the ways in which individual members achieve the aims of the group
      • It includes...
        • The way care work is organised
        • Dress code
        • Methods of communication
        • Ways in which clients are approached
      • How does organisational culture develop?
        • Communication
        • Induction and training
        • Policies and procedures
        • Mission statements
          • Mission statements are formal statements of the aims and values of an organisation
        • Recruitment of staff
      • Barriers to organisational culture...
        • Inappropriate recruitment - people may be recruited who do not agree with the aims, culture and ethics of an orgnisation
        • Rapid staff turnover - means there is a lack of stability and continuity within the workplace
      • Charles Handy: 4 Orgnaisational Cultures
        • POWER CULTURE
          • This is like a web with a ruling spider. Those in the web are dependent on a central power source
            • Rays of power and influence spread out from a central figure or group.
        • ROLE CULTURE
          • A person's job title or role position is central to their experience of the organisation
            • Can be an inflexible care setting, with difficulty adjusting to change
        • TASK CULTURE
          • Focus on collaboration between people with specialist skills and knowledge who all contribute in a cooperative way in order to achieve a specific goal.
            • The emphasis is on achieving specific results and getting things done.
              • A flexible and adaptable culture, but with less control and monitoring of individuals
        • PERSON CULTURE
          • Individual is central point and focus
            • Structure exists only to serve the individuals within it
              • The individuals who are the focus have strong calues about how they will work
                • They have a great deal of control over themselves and autonomy. This makes them difficult to manage.
    • Accountability
      • The requirement to justify and publicise an organisations actions and decisions
      • The board (Lay people with particular expertise in finance and communication) accountable for the internal control of the organisation
      • NHS Trust accountable for the professional standards of service offered to patients in their care
      • Chief executive of a PCT accountable to the department of health for the effective management of the organisation
      • Regulation of professional groups...
        • The General Medical Council (GMC) has 4 main functions...
          • Keeps an up to date register of qualified doctors
          • Developing good medical practice
          • Promoting high standards od medical education
          • Dealing with poorly performing doctors whose practice does not meet the standards required
        • The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC)...
          • Maintains a register of qualified nurses, midwives and health visitors
          • Sets standards for education, practice and conduct
          • Provides advice for nurses, midwives and health visitors
          • Considers allegations of misconduct or unfitness to practice due to ill health
        • The General Social Care Council (GSCC) is responsible for...
          • Developing the code of practice for social care workers
          • Keeping a register of social care professionals
          • The training and education of social care workers

Comments

lisamsmith

Kayleigh,

very helpful...thanks for sharing

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