STAGES OF SLEEP

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  • STAGES OF SLEEP
    • AO1
      • 5 Stages of sleep
      • Usually experience 5 sleep cycles a night- each lasting 90mins
      • First 4 stages are NREM and the 5th is REM
      • Stage 1 & 2 are light sleep characterised by a change in the brains electrical activity/
        • The awake brain produces beta waves, however they change to alpha & theta waves during stages 1 & 2
      • Stages 3 & 4 use slow delta waves. These stages are known as Slow Wave Sleep (SWS)
        • Can be very hard waking someone in this stage, though the person can be aroused by eg. a baby crying.
        • Most of bodys physiological repair work undertaken & important biochemical processes take place
      • In REM theres fast EEG activity resembling an awake brain. Its also known as Paradoxical Sleep as the brain and eyes are active but the bodys paralysed.
        • Periods of REM get longer in the course of the night and its associated with dreaming.
    • AO2
      • RESEARCH EVIDENCE
        • DEMENT & KLIETMAN- evidence that sleep consists of clear differentiated stages of brain activity
      • CONTRADICTORY RESEARCH
        • However, figures as high as 70% for the percentage of reported dreams in NREM
          • FOULKS attributed this to confusion as to what constitutes a dream
      • PSYCHOLOGY AS A SCIENCE
        • research uses scientific approaches in a lab to test hypothesis. However, people are wearing electrodes whilst sleeping etc so this may not reflect real life sleep
      • POPULATION VALIDITY
        • Lack of research into normal sleep among the middle aged. DEMENT believes its because they're too busy raising families etc.
        • Their busy lives suggest that they are the precise group to do the research with since its also the time where the greatest no. of sleep problems occur. Suggesting our knowledge in stages of sleep is limited due to volunteer samples.

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