Organisations, Movements and members

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  • Created by: Whaaaat
  • Created on: 23-05-14 09:53
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  • Organisations, Movements and Members
    • Church and Sect
      • Church and sect are the two MAIN types of religious organisations.
      • Churches are large, run by bureaucratic hierarchy of professionals (priests), they claim a monopoly of the truth. They're universalistic including the whole of society but are more attractive to higher classed members as they're generally more conservative and close to the state
      • Sects are small organisations, exclusive, hostile to wider society and expect a high level of commitment. They draw their members from the poor and oppressed, led by a charismatic leader. THE ONLY SIMILARITY IS THAT SECTS ALSO CLAIM A MONOPOLY OVER THE TRUTH
    • Denominations and Cults
      • Denomination seen as lying between church and sect (Methodist). More inclusive but less open to wider society. Broadly accept society's values but aren't linked to the state. Impose minor restrictions such as drinking and gambling but aren't as demanding as sects and do not claim monopoly over the truth
      • Cults are the least organised, highly individualistic and generally have a small group. They share themesand beliefs but arent exclusive in their belief system, led by 'practitioners' or 'therapists' who claim special knowledge. Cults don't demand strong commitment, many are world affirming.
    • Similarities - Churches and sects claim their interpretation of faith is the legitimate or correct one. Denominations and cults can have varied interpretations. How they're seen by wider society - Churches and Denominations are seen as respectable but cults and sects are seen as deviant.
      • Denominations and Cults
        • Denomination seen as lying between church and sect (Methodist). More inclusive but less open to wider society. Broadly accept society's values but aren't linked to the state. Impose minor restrictions such as drinking and gambling but aren't as demanding as sects and do not claim monopoly over the truth
        • Cults are the least organised, highly individualistic and generally have a small group. They share themesand beliefs but arent exclusive in their belief system, led by 'practitioners' or 'therapists' who claim special knowledge. Cults don't demand strong commitment, many are world affirming.
      • Church and Sect
        • Church and sect are the two MAIN types of religious organisations.
        • Churches are large, run by bureaucratic hierarchy of professionals (priests), they claim a monopoly of the truth. They're universalistic including the whole of society but are more attractive to higher classed members as they're generally more conservative and close to the state
        • Sects are small organisations, exclusive, hostile to wider society and expect a high level of commitment. They draw their members from the poor and oppressed, led by a charismatic leader. THE ONLY SIMILARITY IS THAT SECTS ALSO CLAIM A MONOPOLY OVER THE TRUTH
    • New Religious Movements
      • NRMs have been increasing since 1960 with the Unification Church of 'Moonies', Children of God, Krishna Consciousness. Wallis tries to classify them:
        • World rejecting NRMs
          • (Moonies, Krishna Consciousness Children of God etc.) Have a clear notion of God, highly critical of outside world and society, to achieve salvation members must break away from their former lives, have conservative morals about things like sex and abortion
      • World Accommodating NRMs
        • Break-away from mainstream churches such as neo-Pentecostalism who split from Catholicism. Don't accept or reject the world and focus on religious rather than worldly matters seeking to retrieve spiritual purity of religion.
      • World Affirming NRMs
        • Differ from all other religions. Some are not highly organised yet they offer followers spiritual access (Scientology, TM) . They accept the world as it is, non-exclusive and tolerant of other religions, most are cults.

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