Legislation

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  • Legislation
    • Civil Contigencies Act 2004
      • Key Aspects
        • It establishes how organisations, such as emergency services, local authorities and health bodies, can work together and share information.
        • This Act sets out how organisations must work together to plan and respond to local and national emergencies.
        • It requires that risk assessments are undertaken and emergency plans are put in place.
      • Roles and Responsibilities of local resonders
        • put in place Business Continuity Management arrangements
        • Share information with other local responders to enhance co-ordination; Slough Borough Council does this via the Thames Valley Local Resilience Forum. 
        • put in place arrangements to make information available to the public about civil protection matters and maintain arrangements to warn, inform and advise the public in the event of an emergency
        • Provide advice and assistance to businesses and voluntary organisations about business continuity management.
        • put in place emergency plans
        • co-operate with other local responders to enhance co-ordination and efficiency, which Slough Borough Council does via the Thames Valley Local Resilience Forum
        • Assess the risk of emergencies occurring and use this to inform contingency planning. This is collated at a local level to form a Community Risk Register
      • Aim
        • "To make provision about civil contingencies."
      • Main provisions
        • Imposes a duty to cooperate and share information on all organisations classified as Category 1 responders (emergency services, local authorities and NHS bodies) and obliges other local bodies described as Category 2 responders (the Health and Safety Executive, transport and utility companies) to cooperate with regards to emergency preparedness and response.
        • Requires local and regional authorities to design detailed plans for dealing with an emergency.
        • Grants ministers wide-ranging powers during an emergency, including the right to amend any act of parliament accept the Human Rights Act. These amendments only last for 21 days.
        • Limits the use of emergency powers to 30 days.
        • Includes a "triple lock guarantee" to ensure the powers are only evoked in a genuine emergency. Ministers must be sure the situation presents a serious threat to the United Kingdom's human welfare, environment or security, they must show emergency regulations are necessary and their response must be proportionate. 
      • Definition of Emergency
        • an event or situation which threatens serious damage to human welfare.
        • an event or situation which threatens serious damage to the environment
        • war, or terrorism, which threatens serious damage to security.
      • How does it promote Health, Safety and Security?
        • Helps to keep the public safe during national emergencies.
    • Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations (COSHH) 2002
      • Key Aspects
        • It requires employers to provide information, training and supervision so that work activities can be carried out safely.
        • It requires employers to have procedures in place for safe working with hazardous substances.
        • This Act requires employers to carry out a risk assessment to prevent or control exposure to hazardous substances.
      • Chemicals the Act covers
        • Vapours
        • Dust
        • Mists and Gazes
        • Fumes
        • Biological Agents
      • Chemicals the Act doesn't cover
        • Asbestos
        • Radioactive substances
        • Lead
      • Features
        • Prevents accidents/illnesses caused by exposure to hazardous substances. 
        • Requires employers to perform risk assessment before using certain substances. 
        • Requires adequate control measures and equipment associated with them (including PPE).
        • Encourages employers to use safer alternatives.
        • Sets safe limits for storage, exposure etc. 
        • Controls storage, handling and safe disposal of materials.
      • Examples of substances hazardous to health
        • Glue: Store locked away from young children/unauthorised people.
        • Flammable chemicals: Store in a fire resistant locked cupboard away from sparks etc. 
        • Bleaching agent:  Store in clearly marked container in a locked cupboard. 
        • Poisons: Store in a locked cupboard with clear instructions for dealing with accidents. In a place with limited staff access. 
      • How does it promote Health, Safety and Security?
        • Keeps individuals safe from Hazardous Substances.
    • Data Protection Act 1998
      • Key aspects
        • It requires that information is kept secure.
        • The main Act that provides the security of personal information.
        • It requires that information is kept accurate and up to date.
      • Information and Data should be:
        • Used only for the purpose intended
        • Adequate and relevant but not excessive
        • Not transferred to other countries
        • Secured
        • Kept for no longer than is necessary
        • Processed fairly and lawfully
        • Processed in line with the rights of the individual
        • Accurate and kept up to date
      • How does it promote Health, Safety and Security?
        • Keeps individuals personal data safe and secured

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