Human fieldwork- Do inequalities in housing exist in Worksop?

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  • Human fieldwork- Do inequalities in housing exist in Worksop?
    • Methods
      • Collect data for the environmental survey that we have evaluated for ourselves to present in a scatter graph.
        • Easy to identify patterns. Ability to plot average scores. Clear and easy to understand. Plot multiple sites on one graph.
          • It was useful as we were able to see a clear correlation between the various sites we visited.
      • Photographs taken so that when we returned we could annotate them.
        • More detailed than a field sketch as it's exact. You can see a variety of features. Can be used to illustrate our other data collection methods. Easy to draw evidenced conclusions.
          • We can illustrate and annotate our pictures to see how different the sites are and what the key differences are.
      • Secondary data of house prices was collected so afterwards so we weren't influenced in our decisions by this factor. We presented this is a bar chart.
        • Good for large data sets. Data can be presented in groups. Good for continuous data.
          • By plotting our prices in a bar chart, the results are easily comparable.
    • Link between data sets.
      • Environmental survey and house prices is that the more the house costs, the higher the environmental rating.
      • Anomalies
        • Line of best fit on our graph and looking at points that didn't fit the pattern.
        • Park Street is the anomaly.
          • It's an anomaly because it is a terraced house with a fairly big amount of space however it costs significantly more than what you would expect. After analysing this, we realised this was because it is near the town centre.
    • Types of sampling
      • Systematic sampling
        • Deliberately choosing which areas to sample to ensure coverage of all areas you want to study.
          • Specific points to analyse
      • Stratified sampling
        • Data collected at set intervals
          • Every 5th house/ every 5 metres
      • Random sampling
        • Sampling using random numbers where every item has an equal chance of being chosen.
          • House numbers into a random generator and then chosen
    • Risk assessment
      • Crossing roads
        • 3
          • Plan a route with not a lot of roads to cross in. Put students in the care of adults and make everyone aware of the potential dangers.
      • Unstable surfaces
        • 2
          • Make everyone take care when walking and warn of any dangers when out and about.
      • Traffic
        • 2
          • Stick to paths and ensure good behaviour occurs at all times.
      • Rain/ wet surfaces
        • 3
          • Appropriate clothing worn. Alert of any potential slippery areas.
    • Data collection
      • Primary data
        • Data that you collect
          • Environmental survey/ size of garage
      • Secondary data
        • Data collected elsewhere
          • Cost of houses/ how many bedrooms
    • Conclusion
      • Firstly from collecting my data, I can see that inequalities in housing do exist in Worksop. In my data, at site 1 which was on Netherton road outside school, I have rated the size as at 0 as it is a semi-detached house and the price is £75,00. In comparison, on Sparken hill at site 6, the size is 3 as it is a large detached house and the price is £230,000. This costs significantly more and it is also bigger. This proves that in such a small area difference, there can be such differences in price and size. The smaller houses look less attractive and the bigger homes look more attractive. There is an anomaly in our data which is on Park Street. It doesn’t fit in the line of best fit or with the trend of our data. 
        • The methods we used were all successful because they all showed us easily comparable results to be able to answer our key question with in detail. It was easy to draw a clear conclusion because we had lots of data to draw an evidenced conclusion from.
          • Overall, from our data we can conclude that inequalities do exist in Worksop and how these vary in a set distance.
      • Reliability
        • Not very reliable as we used a stratified sample so we chose where to look to be able to prove our question
          • Better to selct places using random sampling and to collect data from more than 6 sites.
        • Other data
          • Crime rates to be able to see if that affected the price of the house and then we could have compared it to other areas.
          • Distance from the CBD/ good transport links to see how this affects house prices.
          • Area of the house as we only used our own judgement which may not have been very accurate.
  • More detailed than a field sketch as it's exact. You can see a variety of features. Can be used to illustrate our other data collection methods. Easy to draw evidenced conclusions.
    • We can illustrate and annotate our pictures to see how different the sites are and what the key differences are.
  • Key
  • Description
    • Justification
      • Evaluation
  • Risk factor
    • Level of risk (1-4)
      • Reducing the risk
  • What
    • Description
      • Example
  • What
    • Description
      • Example

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