Health & Social Care, Life Stages and Types of Development

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  • GCSE Health & Social Care Lifestages
    • Infancy (0-3 years)
      • Physical
        • - Increase in height
        • - Increase in weight
        • - Milk teeth
        • - Crawls, sits, walks, climbs, runs
        • - Pokes objects, points to things, picks up and drops objects
        • - Pincer grip
      • Intelletual
        • - Language, names of objects, sentences, understanding speech
        • - Concepts of colour, shape, number
      • Social
        • - Smiling
        • - Attachment
      • Emotional
        • - Crying and screaming
        • - Self-concept
        • - Attachment
        • - Tantrums
    • Childhood (4-10 years)
      • Physical Development
        • - Grows in height
        • - Increases in weight
        • Permanent teeth
        • Increasing strength, stamina and coordination
        • Hops, rides bicycle
        • Draws pictures, uses tools
      • Intellectual Development
        • - Learns through play
        • - Language - larger vocabulary, complex sentences
        • - Reading and writing
        • - Problem solving - arithmetic
        • - Memory for events
      • Emotional Development
        • - Control of emotions
        • - Empathy
        • - Has likes and dislikes
        • - Tolerates short separations
        • - Self-concept includes abilities
      • Social Development
        • - New social skills - sharing, turn-taking, cooperation
        • - Relies on parents for support
        • - Attachment weaker
        • - First Friendships
    • Adulthood (19-65 years)
      • Intellectual Development
        • - Reduced curiosity
        • - Increase in knowledge
        • Practical experience, wisdom
      • Physical Development
        • - Peak strength, stamina and coordination
        • - Weight gain
        • - Menopause (women) - end of ovulation and menstruation, hot flushes
      • Social Development
        • - Long-term partnerships
        • Bonding with infants
        • - Work relationships
        • Increased social skills, e.g. leadership
      • Emotional Development
        • - Self-concept includes family, work, achievements
        • - Increased confidence
        • - Emotionally more stable
    • Later Adulthood (65+ years)
      • Physical
        • - Getting shorter
        • - Weight loss
        • - Skin thinner, less elastic
        • - Reduced strength, stamina, flexibility and agility
      • Emotional
        • - Reduced self-concept
        • - Reduced confidence
        • - Reduced self-esteem
        • - Upsetting bereavement
        • - Loneliness
      • Social
        • - Less social contact
        • - Retirement
        • - Death of partner
        • - Social isolation
        • - Reduced social skills
      • Intellectual
        • - Forgetting words
        • - Action slips
        • - Slower problem solving
        • - Slow to adapt to new ideas
        • - Reduced short- and long-term memory
        • - Reduced memory for recent events
    • Adolescence (11-18 years)
      • Physical
        • - Growth spurt
        • Sexual maturity, secondary sex characteristics
        • - Increased strength, stamina, coordination
      • Emotional
        • - Body image important
        • - Self consciousness
        • - Mood swings
        • - Sexual attraction
        • - Greater autonomy
      • Social
        • - Deeper, stronger friendships
        • - Greater peer influence
        • - Less parental influence
        • - Social awkwardness
        • - Relationships based on sexual attractiveness
      • Intellectual
        • - Hypothetical problem solving
        • - Increased concentration span
        • - Increased language skills
        • - More learning stategies
  • Growth in adolescence
    • Girls
      • Growth spurt: 10-12 years
      • Puberty: increase in size of vagibna,. menstruation, ovulation
      • Secondary sexual characteristics: Breasts develop and pubic hair
    • Boys
      • Growth spurt: 12-15 years
      • Puberty: Increase in size of testes, increase in size of penis, erection, sperm production
      • Secondary sexual characteristics: Facial hair, voice breaking, pubic hair
  • Motor Development in infancy
    • Fine motor skills: the child becomes able to make precise movements using just a few muscle groups, e.g. golding a pencil
    • Gross motor skills: the child becomes able to make whole-body movements, suing large muslces and muscle groups, e.g. dancing

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