Nutritional value, choice and use of FISH

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  • Nutritional value, choice and use of FISH
    • Nutritional value
      • Good source of protein containing 15-20g per 100g
      • Good source of iodine
      • Small fish eaten whole such as whitebait and some canned fish provide calcium
      • Oily fish are a source of vitamin A and D
      • Fish liver oils contain omega 3 fatty acids
    • Choice
      • White fish
        • Cod- can be cut into steaks or filleted into portions
        • Coley- often used in stews, soups or pies
        • Haddock- very versatile fish
        • Hake- very delicate flavour
        • Halibut- can be poached, boiled or grilled
        • Plaice- usually deep fried or grilled
        • Sea bass- excellent flavour and lean, white soft flesh
        • Skate- very large and bony flat fish
      • Oily
        • Salmon- fresh, tinned and smoked
        • Mackerel- Traditionally grilled, fried or smoked
        • Kippers- salted, dried or smoked and usually eaten at breakfast
        • Anchovies- small round fish mainly tinned in oil
        • Sardines- eaten fresh or bought tinned
        • Tuna- eaten fresh or tinned in brine or oil
      • Shellfish
        • Mussels- tender and delicate. Can be served hot or cold
        • Oysters- eaten raw so need to be fresh
      • Crustaceans
        • Crab- used in cocktails and salads or eaten on it's own
        • Prawns- used for canapés and salads
        • Lobster- served hot or cold
    • Use
      • Frying- fish can be coated in egg and breadcrumbs
      • Grilling- preserves flavour and successful with whole, flat or oily fish
      • Baking- retains moisture and preserves flavour
      • Poaching- small amount of liquid such as milk or stock
      • Steaming- electric steamer or on a plate over boiling water
    • Preserved
      • Salting, marinating, drying, smoking, canning or freezing
  • Oily
    • Salmon- fresh, tinned and smoked
    • Mackerel- Traditionally grilled, fried or smoked
    • Kippers- salted, dried or smoked and usually eaten at breakfast
    • Anchovies- small round fish mainly tinned in oil
    • Sardines- eaten fresh or bought tinned
    • Tuna- eaten fresh or tinned in brine or oil

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