Essay Plan

The essay plan for my coursework.

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  • Essay Plan
    • THE DIFFERENCE IN THE TREATMENT OF MEN AND WOMEN IN SOCIETY
      • 'Why should there be one law for men and another for women?
      • The lack of Mr.Bracknell and curious references to him: pg.60 l.331
        • 'the same list as the dear duchess of Bolton' pg. 67 l.482
      • 'Thank you, Lady Bracknell, I prefer standing.' pg.66 l.479
      • 'But even men of the noblest possible moral character are extremely susceptible to the influence of the physical charms of others.' pg110  l.621
      • 'How absurd to talk about the equality of the sexes! Where questions of self-sacrifice are concerned, men are infinitely beyond us.' pg.126 l.60
    • TRUTH DEFEATS DECEIT
      • Use of the word 'Candidly': pg.54 l.198, pg.63 l.411, pg.109 l.614
        • 'I think that whenever one has anything unpleasant to say, one should always be quite candid.' p109 l.615
      • Truth is shown in a negative way, but actually resolves problems.
        • Develops from: ignorance better, knowledge worse to knowledge being better and overpowering the evil i.e. providing conclusion and marriage
        • "It is very painful for me to be forced to speak the truth.' pg.117 l.767
        • 'It is a terrible thing for a man to find out suddenly that all his life he has been speaking nothing but the truth.' pg.146 l.476
    • THE INSENSIBILITY OF 19TH CENTURY ETIQUETTE
      • 'I keep science for life' p45, l.6
        • Shows complications of society that it needs to be a science
      • Jack's description of moral tone at pg.54 l.205-215
        • 'My duty as a gentleman has never interfered with my pleasures to the smallest degree.' pg.99 l.375
      • 'Particularly at the end of the season when everyone has practically said whatever they had to say, which, in most cases, was probably not much.' pg.61 l.355
      • 'We live, as I hope you know, Mr.Worthing,in an age of ideals.' pg.63 l.392
        • 'We live, I regret to say, in an age of surfaces.' pg.131 l.165
      • 'I hope you will always look at me just like that, especially when there are other people present.' pg.65 l.457
      • the importance of shaking hands (pg.97)
      • The idea of Cecily organising whole marriage without Algy's knowledge mirrors insensibility of arrange marriage pg.104
        • Also shows different treatment between man and woman - would have been less strange reversed
          • THE DIFFERENCE IN THE TREATMENT OF MEN AND WOMEN IN SOCIETY
            • 'Why should there be one law for men and another for women?
            • The lack of Mr.Bracknell and curious references to him: pg.60 l.331
              • 'the same list as the dear duchess of Bolton' pg. 67 l.482
            • 'Thank you, Lady Bracknell, I prefer standing.' pg.66 l.479
            • 'But even men of the noblest possible moral character are extremely susceptible to the influence of the physical charms of others.' pg110  l.621
            • 'How absurd to talk about the equality of the sexes! Where questions of self-sacrifice are concerned, men are infinitely beyond us.' pg.126 l.60
      • 'There is no time for wearing the shallow mask of manners' pg.122 l.675
        • And then they do!
      • 'In matters of grave importance, style, not sincerity is the vital thing.' pg.124 l.27
        • Yet style is a front:
          • 'Style  largely depends on how the chin is worn' pg.132 l.179
          • 'There is no time for wearing the shallow mask of manners' pg.122 l.675
            • And then they do!
          • 'We live, I regret to say, in an age of surfaces.' pg.131 l.165
          • 'He has nothing, but he looks everything. What more can one desire?' pg.133 l.215
      • Extreme importamce in wealth
        • When Lady B is about to leave until she hears of Cecily's wealth, pg 131
    • IS KNOWLEDGE POWER OR IS IGNORANCE BLISS?
      • 'Everybody who is incapable of learning has taken to teaching.'
      • 'Education is an admirable thing, but it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is ever worth knowing can be taught.'
        • ''Cecily, Mamma, whose views on education are remarkably strict, has brought me up to be extremely short-sighted' pg.108 l.588
      • What one should read and what one shouldn't. pg.51 l.130-135
      • Algy keeps Ernest's card as proof. pg.52 l.165
        • Also keeps Jack's address
      • 'I know nothing, Lady Bracknell. / I am pleased to hear it.' pg .67 l.495
      • 'My dear  fellow, the truth isn't quite the sort of thing one tells to a nice sweet refined girl.' pg.74 l.641
        • 'If I am occasionally overdressed,I make up for it by being always immensely overeducated.' pg.100 l.396
          • THE INSENSIBILITY OF 19TH CENTURY ETIQUETTE
            • 'I keep science for life' p45, l.6
              • Shows complications of society that it needs to be a science
            • Jack's description of moral tone at pg.54 l.205-215
              • 'My duty as a gentleman has never interfered with my pleasures to the smallest degree.' pg.99 l.375
            • 'Particularly at the end of the season when everyone has practically said whatever they had to say, which, in most cases, was probably not much.' pg.61 l.355
            • 'We live, as I hope you know, Mr.Worthing,in an age of ideals.' pg.63 l.392
              • 'I hope you will always look at me just like that, especially when there are other people present.' pg.65 l.457
              • the importance of shaking hands (pg.97)
              • The idea of Cecily organising whole marriage without Algy's knowledge mirrors insensibility of arrange marriage pg.104
                • Also shows different treatment between man and woman - would have been less strange reversed
                • 'In matters of grave importance, style, not sincerity is the vital thing.' pg.124 l.27
                  • Yet style is a front:
                    • 'Style  largely depends on how the chin is worn' pg.132 l.179
                    • 'He has nothing, but he looks everything. What more can one desire?' pg.133 l.215
                • Extreme importamce in wealth
                  • When Lady B is about to leave until she hears of Cecily's wealth, pg 131
            • Pg.116: 'A gross deception has been practised on both of us.' ignorance was better and happier
              • Develops from: ignorance better, knowledge worse to knowledge being better and overpowering the evil i.e. providing conclusion and marriage
          • IT IS NOT MADE FOR MEANING
            • 'That, my dear young friend, is the theory that the corrupt French Drama has been propounding for the last fifty years.' pg.56 l.272
            • 'You always want to argue about things. / That is exactly what things were originally made for.' pg 73 l.620
            • ''The only way to make love to a woman is to make love to her if she is pretty, and to someone else if she is plain.' pg.74 l.644
              • Later marries
            • 'You never talk anything but nonsense. / Nobody ever does.' pg.81 l.755
          • A TRIVIAL COMEDY FOR SERIOUS PEOPLE
            • 'Well, one must be serious about something, if one wats to have any amusement in life.' pg.119 l.794
              • 'What on earth you areserious about I haven't got the remotest idea. About everything, I should fancy. You have such an bsolutely trivial nature.'
            • 'You seem to be displaying signs of triviality. / On the contrary, Aunt Augusta, I've now realised for the first time in my life the importance of being Earnest.'
              • TRUTH DEFEATS DECEIT
                • Use of the word 'Candidly': pg.54 l.198, pg.63 l.411, pg.109 l.614
                  • 'I think that whenever one has anything unpleasant to say, one should always be quite candid.' p109 l.615
                • Truth is shown in a negative way, but actually resolves problems.
                  • "It is very painful for me to be forced to speak the truth.' pg.117 l.767
                  • 'It is a terrible thing for a man to find out suddenly that all his life he has been speaking nothing but the truth.' pg.146 l.476
        • Wagnerian?
        • moral duty, pg 112, Jack in country, watering flowers,

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