Crime and Punishment 1000-1500

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  • Crime and Punishement 1000-1500
    • Punishment
      • Examples
        • Blood Feud
        • Execution
        • Pillories
        • Wergild
        • Stocks
        • Murdrum Fines
    • Case Study Did the Church help or Hinder justice
      • Trial by Ordeal
        • Used to judge guilt or innocence in the eyes of God
        • Ended in 1215
        • Used when juries could not reach a judgement
        • Legally Unreliable
      • Sanctuary
        • If someone on the run got ot a church, he or she could claim sanctuary
        • This meant they were under the protection of the Church
          • If someone on the run got ot a church, he or she could claim sanctuary
        • You then had 40 days to leave the countyr or face trial
          • Those who chose to leave had to walk to the nearest port and board the first ship leaving
      • Church Courts
        • The Church held the right to try any churchman accused of a crime
        • Church courts never senteced anyone to death
        • Church courts also dealt with a range of moral offences
    • Definitions of crime
      • Theft
      • Murder
      • ****
      • Arson
      • Drunk and Disordely
      • Treason
    • Case Study: Norman Conquest 1066
      • Impact on definitions of crime
        • Forest Laws
          • Made legal activities into serious offences
        • Treason
      • Impact on Punishment
        • Used fines for lesser crimes. William got all the fines
        • Church Courts were introduced
    • Methods of law enforcement
      • Church
        • Sanctuary
          • This meant they were under the protection of the Church
            • You then had 40 days to leave the countyr or face trial
              • Those who chose to leave had to walk to the nearest port and board the first ship leaving
          • Church Courts
            • The Church held the right to try any churchman accused of a crime
            • Church courts never senteced anyone to death
            • Church courts also dealt with a range of moral offences
        • Local Measures
          • Tithings
            • Group of ten men
            • Responsble for each others behaviour
            • If one of them broke the law, the other members had to bring him to court or pay a fine.
          • Hue and Cry
            • If a crime was committed the victim was expected to raise the 'hue and cry'
            • The entire village was expected to down tools and hunt down the criminal
            • If a person did not join, the whole village would have to pay a fine
          • Trial by local jury
            • The jury was made up of men from the village
            • The victim and criminal would give their versions of events and it is up to the jury to decide.
            • If there was no clear evidence they jury would decide from what they knew about the two people

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