Attraction

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  • Attraction
    • Walster et al (1966)
      • 'Computer Dance' was advertised to students during fresher's week
      • first 376 males and 376 females were allowed in at $1.00 each
      • students asked to fill in a questionnaire - told it would be able to allocate their ideal partner
        • pairing actually done randomly
      • four independent judges secretly assessed each student's physical attractiveness
      • students were then asked to complete a questionnaire about their date
      • Findings
        • physical attractiveness was the most importnat factor in how much they enjoyed the date
        • partners were more likely to date if they had similar physical attractiveness
      • Evaluation
        • strengths
          • students did not know they were part of research
            • behaviour and answers were free from bias
          • field study - natural enironment
          • similar findings in other research - Murstein (1972)
        • weaknesses
          • research was artificial
            • students were new - don't represent general students
          • different perceptions of attractiveness
            • younger people may find attractiveness different to older people
          • ethical issues
            • no informed consent + deception took place
    • Social Exchange Theory
      • Evaluation
        • Three factor theory of love
          • theory describes types of love based on three different scales
            • intimacy
              • closeness between two people
            • passion
              • drive that leads to romantic attraction
            • commitment
              • decision to stay with the partner - no relationships with others
          • three aspects of love likely to shift through the course of a relationship
        • Social Exchange Theory
          • ignores cultural differences - may only apply to western relationships
          • too simplistic
          • measuring the value (rewards) is different for us as individuals
          • suggests we're not concerned with the equality of the relationship
        • Three factor theory of love
          • allows for the description of a variety of relationships
          • allows for the existence of different types of love
          • recognises that relationships change over time
          • everyone has a slightly different idea of what is meant by love
          • cultural differences of what love is e.g. arranged marriages
      • theory suggests that relationship partners focus on rewards and costs
        • social + material rewards
        • opportunity costs
      • focuses on the outcomes of relationships
      • partners evaluate their relationship outcomes on comparison level + comparison level for alternatives
        • comparison level - outcomes people think they deserve or expect
        • comparison level for alternatives - outcomes people think they could get if they entered a different relationship
    • Three factor theory of love
      • theory describes types of love based on three different scales
        • intimacy
          • closeness between two people
        • passion
          • drive that leads to romantic attraction
        • commitment
          • decision to stay with the partner - no relationships with others
      • three aspects of love likely to shift through the course of a relationship
    • Evaluation
      • Social Exchange Theory
        • ignores cultural differences - may only apply to western relationships
        • too simplistic
        • measuring the value (rewards) is different for us as individuals
        • suggests we're not concerned with the equality of the relationship
      • Three factor theory of love
        • allows for the description of a variety of relationships
        • allows for the existence of different types of love
        • recognises that relationships change over time
        • everyone has a slightly different idea of what is meant by love
        • cultural differences of what love is e.g. arranged marriages

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