Women and the Law

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Potestas
a free Roman citizen retained full control over any children born to his wife, any children born to a married son, and any children born to a married son of one of his sons.
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Adultery
A husband may kill his wife and her lover if he catches them in the middle of the act of adultery inside his own home and does so immediately. If he kills only the lover, he must divorce his wife.
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Divorce
Either side was free to end the marriage for any or no reason at all, and "fault" entered the picture only in determining what happened to the dowry and prenuptial gift.
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Concubines
Concubinage was a substitute used when marriage was either illegal or undesirable from the point of view of inheritance. A man could not have a concubine and a wife at the same time.
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Economics of marriage
While a dowry and a marriage contract were not necessary to make a marriage legal, both were very common.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Adultery

Back

A husband may kill his wife and her lover if he catches them in the middle of the act of adultery inside his own home and does so immediately. If he kills only the lover, he must divorce his wife.

Card 3

Front

Divorce

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Concubines

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Economics of marriage

Back

Preview of the front of card 5

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