US CIVIL RIGHTS: WOMEN - PART 1 (1865-1914)

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Women’s crusade (1873-74)
A culmination across the United States of many years of women taking direct action against the saloon and the liquor traffic - reduce alcohol consumption: domestic violence, poor decision making, violent reactions.
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Hull House Chicago
JANE ADDAMS; opened its doors to recently arrived European immigrants. Drop off children, learn and work. Accommodation for poor families - up until 1970s before it closes down. Classes, learning, education - women and children.
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Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU)
first mass organisation among women devoted to social reform, reducing/prohibition of alcohol, with a program that "linked the religious and the secular through concerted and far-reaching reform strategies based on applied Christianity.”
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National Consumer’s league (NCL)
encouraged consumers to buy products without being made using sweatshop labour - women’s interest in charity. BOYCOTTING. Isn’t national news/coverage as no media in this era, so hard to do a national boycott, AHEAD OF THEIR TIME.
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National Association of Coloured Women (NACW)
"Lifting as we climb"- stop lynching. AA women weren't allowed to join any other women’s groups, so they made their own. Like white women - excluded from benefits of 15th amendment.
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Lucretia Mott
Helped write the Declaration of Sentiments during the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention - document was the "grand movement for attaining the civil, social, political, and religious rights of women.”
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Elizabeth Cady Stanton
suffragist - helped write Declaration of Sentiments. Often credited with initiating the first organized women's rights and women's suffrage movements in the United States. President of the National Woman Suffrage Association from 1892 until 1900.
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Carrie Chapman Catt
(SUFFRAGIST) - campaigned for 19th amendment (1920). President of NAWSA and was the founder of the League of Women Voters and the International Alliance of Women.
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Alice Paul
(SUFFRAGETTE) - campaigned for 19th amendment. Hunger strikes, protest marches. Dressed up as a man to vote and arrested for 7 months. 50 years as leader of the National Woman's Party, which fought for ERA . SUCCESS - in the form of CRA (1964).
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Elizabeth Blackwell
first female doctor.
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Lucy Stone
First woman from Massachusetts to earn a college degree - she made correlation that educated women are going to be the movers and shakers in the women’s movement. Forms the first women’s suffrage movement: National Women's Rights Convention.
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Susan B. Anthony
founded the New York Women's State Temperance Society, American Equal Rights Association (1866), newspaper called 'The Revolution' (1868), National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA) (1869) - merged with Stone to form NAWSA.
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Civil war
a lost generation of women as their men go off to fight; women have to fend for themselves. Allowed married women to work outside the home; e.g/ farming, writing and nursing.
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15th Amendment 1870
EXCLUDES WOMEN > when white women who have worked so hard for abolition ask for the favour to be returned they get nothing, seen as something of a betrayal. the Clarion call to middle class women who want the vote.
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Comstock laws 1873
criminalised sending contraceptives, sex toys etc by post - Just diaphragms and sheep bladders for condoms. It was your right as a man to take your conjugal rights if they were denied you; led to **** as women showed abstinence from sex.
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Rising divorce rate by 1900
In 1880, about 1 in every 21 marriages ended in divorce. By 1900, had risen to 1 in 12. Dissatisfaction with marriage - women not happy to be subjugated in a violent, loveless relationship.
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Women and Children in the workplace
In 1900 there were 4 million children working in textiles, other manufacturing industries and in coal mines. By 1907, 30 states had abolished child labour, largely as a result of the pressure from women’s groups. Legislation regulating working hours
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

JANE ADDAMS; opened its doors to recently arrived European immigrants. Drop off children, learn and work. Accommodation for poor families - up until 1970s before it closes down. Classes, learning, education - women and children.

Back

Hull House Chicago

Card 3

Front

first mass organisation among women devoted to social reform, reducing/prohibition of alcohol, with a program that "linked the religious and the secular through concerted and far-reaching reform strategies based on applied Christianity.”

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

encouraged consumers to buy products without being made using sweatshop labour - women’s interest in charity. BOYCOTTING. Isn’t national news/coverage as no media in this era, so hard to do a national boycott, AHEAD OF THEIR TIME.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

"Lifting as we climb"- stop lynching. AA women weren't allowed to join any other women’s groups, so they made their own. Like white women - excluded from benefits of 15th amendment.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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