Reaching a Verdict - Majority Influence, Asch

HideShow resource information
Aim
investigate effects of conformity to the majority when the task is unambiguous
1 of 10
Method and Participants
lab experiment, with 123 American male students
2 of 10
Procedure
In a group of 7-9, where only 1 student was the real subject (rest confederates), they were shown a series of lines. Confederates gave the same incorrect answer on 12 critical trials. Answer aloud. measured number of times p's conformed to majority.
3 of 10
Results
32% of the participants conformed to the majority. 25% didn't conform at all. when 1 confederate in the group gave the right answer, conformity fell to 5%.
4 of 10
Conclusion
people conform for 2 reasons: to fit in with the group (normative) and because they believe the group is better informed (informative)
5 of 10
Application of Asch's study
some members of the jury may sway towards the opinions of the majoirty in order to avoid alienation from the social majority; they would rather conform than be the odd one out.
6 of 10
Conformity
is when an individual gives up their personal views under group pressure, thus yielding to group pressure. This can be for two reasons:
7 of 10
Infrmational Social Influence
they don't know the answer so look to the group for guidance
8 of 10
Nomative Social Influence
individual outwardly conforms to avoid rejection from the group but inwardly disagrees.
9 of 10
Majority Influence on jurors
Research with 225 juries showed that the guilty view at the begining led to guilty verdict 86% of the time, showing that majority has a powerful influence.
10 of 10

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Method and Participants

Back

lab experiment, with 123 American male students

Card 3

Front

Procedure

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Results

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Conclusion

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »See all Criminological and Forensic Psychology resources »