Post-War Britain: The Welfare State and the Planned Economy

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What does 'Welfare state' mean?
A state in which the government tries to provide the best possible social services for everybody.
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What did theb Beveridge report say such a state should aim for?
The elimination of disease, idleness, squalour, want and ignorance.
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By which year had the Labour government created a welfare state?
1948 (July).
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How did some historians describe the introduction of the welfare state?
'the British welfare state was not born- it had evolved'.
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Why did they say this?
Because there was already some government intervention during the war, it just carried on and grew. The welfare state developed starting from 1906- eg. Children's charter, workman's compensation act.
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Who wrote the Beveridge report?
Sir William Beveridge.
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When was the Beveridge report presented to parliament?
November 1942.
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What was the aim of the Beveridge report?
To banish disease, idleness, squalor, want and ignorance from Britain.
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When was the Butler education act passed?
1944.
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What did the Butler education act do?
Free secondary education until the age of 15. Free meals, milk and medical services in school. Grammar school entry exam (11+ test).
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In what way did the Butler education act help working class children?
It allowed them to move up the education ladder.
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Why was the Butler education act criticised?
The quality of education varied across the country- grammar school places were in short supply. The system was divisive- secondary modern schools were seen as second class institutions and got less funding.
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Were the education reforms an example of change or continuity?
Change- working class children could go to university.
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When was the national health service introduced?
1948.
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Which of beveridge's 'giants' did the NHS tackle?
Disease.
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What did the NHS do?
Provided free medical care for the population.
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When was the national insurance act passed?
1946.
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Which of Beveridge's 'giants' did the national insurance act tackle?
Want/idleness.
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What did the national insurance act do?
Provided financial protection for the employed in times of sickness, increased unemployment benefits and widows' pensions.
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When was the national assistance act passed?
1948.
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Which of Beveridge's 'giants' did the national assistance act tackle?
Want.
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What did the national assistance act do?
Helped people who were not in work or those who had not paid enough contributions to the new National Insurance scheme (including OAPs).
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When was the National Insurance Industrial Injuries act passed?
1946.
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Which of Beveridge's 'giants' did the national insurance industrial injuries act tackle?
Want/Idleness.
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What did the national insurance industrial injuries act do?
Provided compensation for people injured at work.
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When was the Butler education act passed?
1944.
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Which of Beveridge's 'giants' did the Butler education act tackle?
Ignorance.
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What did the Butler education act do?
Raised the school leaving age to 15. Set up grammar, secondary, modern and technical schools.
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When was the new towns act passed?
1946.
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When was the town and country planning act passed?
1947.
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Which of Beveridge's 'giants' did these acts tackle?
Squalor.
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What did these acts do?
Built over 1 million new houses and replaced old slum areas.
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What did theb Beveridge report say such a state should aim for?

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The elimination of disease, idleness, squalour, want and ignorance.

Card 3

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By which year had the Labour government created a welfare state?

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Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

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How did some historians describe the introduction of the welfare state?

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Card 5

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Why did they say this?

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