Open and Closed systems.

  • Created by: alex123
  • Created on: 26-11-18 14:02
What are coastal landscapes systems recognised as being?
An open system
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Why they open systems?
energy and matter can be transferred.
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Energy and matter transferred to a neighboring system is a ?
output
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Energy and matter transferred from a neighboring system is a?
input
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give an example of an input?
fluvial sediment from a river
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where is kinetic energy from?
wind and sun
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where is thermal energy from?
the heat of the sun
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Where is potential energy from?
the position of material on slopes;material from marine deposition, weathering and mass movement from cliffs.
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what are the outputs?
marine and wind erosion from beaches and rock surfaces;evaporation.
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what are throughputs?
consist of stones, including beach and nearshore sediment accumulations, and flows (transfers) such as movement of sediment along a beach by longshore drift.
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A sediment cell is generally regarded as a ?
closed system
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A sediment cell is a?
stretch of coastline and its associated nearshore area within which the movement of coarse sediment, sand and shingle is largely self contained.
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how are the boundaries of sediment cells determined?
topography and shape of the coastline
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What can act as a barrier to stop the transfer of sediment?
Large physical features e.g Land's End act as huge natural barriers.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Why they open systems?

Back

energy and matter can be transferred.

Card 3

Front

Energy and matter transferred to a neighboring system is a ?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Energy and matter transferred from a neighboring system is a?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

give an example of an input?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

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