Maternal Deprivation Hypothesis

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  • Created by: EClou
  • Created on: 11-04-15 20:53
what does the maternal deprivation hypothesis state?
a break in the mother-child bond before the child is 2.5 will lead to long term or permanent impairment of the ability make relationships in later life
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according to bowlby what is equal?
the importance of emotional and physical care
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therefore what does this imply about the consequences?
the implications of deprivation of maternal care to mental health is just as serious as the implications of deprivation of vitamins to physical health.
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what would this permanent mental health result from?
one long or several short separations from the PCG before the age of 2.5 and up to age of 5.
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what is a critical period hypothesis?
this the idea that a particular time in an infant's life is crucial for the development if a particular behaviour.
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does separation necessarily result in deprivation?
NO
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give 3 things this theory influenced the change in
it had a huge impact child rearing practices - 1. the care provided for children hospitals, 2. hospital visiting rules, 3. preference for adoption over institutionalisation
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what did Hodges and tizard's study suggest about the critical period?
if deprivation occurs during this period the damage will be permanent
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what koluchova's study show with regards to the critical period?
some children have made good recovery despite many years of deprivation/privation
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what was the aim of the forty four thieves experiment?
to test the maternal deprivation hypothesis looking at children who had been referred to a child guidance clinic with emotional problems
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how did it do this?
by comparing the early life experiences of children who were emotionally maladjusted compared to those who were thieves to see if the thieves had experienced more separations with our adequate care than the other children
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who were the ps and how were they divided?
children from the clinic aged 5-16. experimental group were the thieves and the control group were the emotionally maladjusted children.
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how did bowlby get the information?
he interviewed the children and their parents
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what were his findings?
86% of the "affectionless psychopaths" experienced frequent early separation, 17% other thieves II, 39% of the thieves experienced frequent early separation, 4% of the control kids II
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what did early separations consist of?
repeated stays in foster homes/hospital where they weren't visited by their families.
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what does this experiment suggest?
theres a link between early childhood separations and becoming a thief, they seem to be linked to affectionless psychopathy and can cause emotional maladjustment.
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what are 4 criticisms of this experiment?
1. retrospective study - unreliable memory, 2. bowlby diagnosed the affectionless psychopaths - comes with expectations, 3. privation not deprivation took place in some cases - invalid, 4. natural experiment so causal relat. not demonstrated
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what did Rutter suggest about the causality of this experiment?
there could have been a third variable that causes both separations and maladjustment
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what problem do ethical considerations cause when researching this topic?
research must be carried out with observational studies/case studies/interviews/questionnaires/natural experiments/correlational analysis so it is hard to control extraneous variables and therefore causality is hard to obtain.
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Card 2

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according to bowlby what is equal?

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the importance of emotional and physical care

Card 3

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therefore what does this imply about the consequences?

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Card 4

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what would this permanent mental health result from?

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Card 5

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what is a critical period hypothesis?

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