Linguistic

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Sonnet
A sonnet is a distinctive poetic style that uses system or pattern of metrical structure and verse composition usually consisting of fourteen lines, arranged in a set rhyme scheme or pattern.
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Ballad
A narrative folk song. Subjects for ballads include killings, feuds, important historical events, and rebellion.
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Elegy
A type of literature defined as a song or poem, written in elegiac couplets, that expresses sorrow or lamentation, usually for one who has died.
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Free Verse
Poetry that does not rhyme or have a regular rhythm.
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Enjambment
(in verse) The continuation of a sentence without a pause beyond the end of a line, couplet, or stanza.
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Ambiguity
The quality of being open to more than one interpretation; inexactness.
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Allegory
A narrative that serves as an extended metaphor.
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Irony
A literary term referring to how a person, situation, statement, or circumstance is not as it would actually seem. Many times it is the exact opposite of what it appears to be.
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Dramatic Irony
Dramatic irony occurs when the audience knows something that the characters don’t.
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Imagery
Visually descriptive or figurative language, especially in a literary work.
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Oxymoron
A figure of speech in which apparently contradictory terms appear in conjunction.
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Antithesis
A person or thing that is the direct opposite of someone or something else.
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Juxtaposition
The fact of two things being seen or placed close together with contrasting effect.
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Paradox
A seemingly absurd or contradictory statement or proposition which when investigated may prove to be well founded or true.
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Contrast
To compare in order to show unlikeness or differences.
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Compare
to examine in order to note similarities and differences.
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Direct Address
A construction in which a speaker or writer directly addresses another individual.
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Pun
A joke exploiting the different possible meanings of a word or the fact that there are words which sound alike but have different meanings.
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Repetition
In linguistics and rhetoric, repetition is an instance of using a word, phrase, or clause more than once in a short passage--dwelling on a point
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Emotive Language
Phrasing which creates a strong emotional response in the reader.
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Rhetorical Question
A question asked for the sake of persuasive effect rather than as a genuine request for information.
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Imagery
Visually descriptive or figurative language.
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Rhyme
Correspondence of sound between words or the endings of words.
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Alliteration
The rhetorical device of commencing adjacent or closely connected words with the same sound or syllable.
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Assonance
The recurrence of sounds in proximity.
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Onomatopoeia
he formation of a word from a sound associated with what is named.
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Simile
A figure of speech in which one thing is explicitly compared with something else of a different kind using the words ‘as’ or ‘like.
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Metaphor
A figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action to which it is not literally applicable.
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Personification
The attribution of a personal nature or human characteristics to something non-human, or the representation of an abstract quality in human form.
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Pathetic Fallacy
The attribution of human feelings and responses to inanimate things or animals.
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Hyperbole
A figure of speech involving emphatic exaggeration or overstatement, sometimes based on irony and/or for comic effect.
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Imperative
A sentence that gives advice or instructions or that expresses a request or command.
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Conditional
The conditional tense generally is used to indicate that an action or state of being is conditioned on the occurrence of something else.
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Interrogative
Having the force of a question
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1st, 2nd and 3rd Person narrative
1st person is noticed by "i" 2nd is "you" and 3rd is "he, she or they".
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Anecdote
A short amusing or interesting story about a real incident or person.
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Nouns
A word (other than a pronoun) used to identify any of a class of people, places, or things.
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Adjectives
A word naming an attribute of a noun.
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Pronouns
A word that can function as a noun phrase used by itself and that refers either to the participants in the discourse (e.g. I, you ) or to someone or something mentioned elsewhere in the discourse (e.g. she, it, this ).
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Connectives
A word or phrase whose function is to link other linguistic units.
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Verbs
A word used to describe an action, state, or occurrence, and forming the main part of the predicate of a sentence.
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Adverbs
A word or phrase that modifies the meaning of an adjective, verb, or other adverb, expressing manner, place, time, or degree.
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Preposition
A word governing, and usually preceding, a noun or pronoun and expressing a relation to another word or element in the clause.
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Syntax
The arrangement of words and phrases to create well-formed sentences in a language.
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Lexicon
The vocabulary of a person, language, or branch of knowledge.
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Diction
The choice and use of words and phrases in speech or writing.
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Jargon
Special words or expressions used by a profession or group that are difficult for others to understand.
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Colloquial
(of language) used in ordinary or familiar conversation; not formal or literary.
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Tone
The general character or attitude of a place, piece of writing, situation, etc.
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Mood
The atmosphere that pervades a literary work with the intention of evoking a certain emotion or feeling from the audience.
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Caesura
(in Greek and Latin verse) a break between words within a metrical foot.
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Symbolism
An artistic and poetic movement or style using symbolic images and indirect suggestion to express mystical ideas, emotions, and states of mind.
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Pathos
A quality that evokes pity or sadness.
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Bathos
An effect of anticlimax created by an unintentional lapse in mood from the sublime to the trivial or ridiculous.
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Pattern of Three
A writing principle that suggests that things that come in threes are inherently funnier, more satisfying, or more effective than other numbers of things. The reader or audience of this form of text is also more likely to consume.
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Structure
The arrangement of and relations between the parts or elements of something complex.
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Presentation
The manner or style in which something is given, offered, or displayed.
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Flashbacks
A scene in a film, novel, etc. set in a time earlier than the main story.
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Foreshadow
Be a warning or indication of (a future event).
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Chronological
(of a record of events) following the order in which they occurred.
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Circular Narrative
A story that ends in the same place it began.
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Instuctional
The act or practice of instructing or teaching.
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Sequential
Forming or following in a logical order or sequence.
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Pace
How quickly or how slowly the writer takes a reader through a story.
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Meter
The meter involves exact arrangements of syllables into repeated patterns called feet within a line. Meters are regularized rhythms. an arrangement of language in which the accents occur at apparently equal intervals in time. Each repeated is a foot.
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Rhythm
The measured flow of words and phrases in verse or prose as determined by the relation of long and short or stressed and unstressed syllables.
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Iambic Pentameter
Iambic pentameter is the name given to a line of verse that consists of five iambs.
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Superlatives
(of an adjective or adverb) expressing the highest or a very high degree of a quality (e.g. bravest, most fiercely ).
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Comparatives
Relating to, based on, or involving comparison.
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Prose
Written or spoken language in its ordinary form, without metrical structure.
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Verse
Writing arranged with a metrical rhythm, typically having a rhyme.
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Exaggeration
A statement that represents something as better or worse than it really is.
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Ambivalence
The state of having mixed feelings or contradictory ideas about something or someone.
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Stanza
A group of lines forming the basic recurring metrical unit in a poem; a verse.
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Emotive Language
Phrasing which creates a strong emotional response in the reader.
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Soliloquy
An act of speaking one's thoughts aloud when by oneself or regardless of any hearers, especially by a character in a play.
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Monologue
A long speech by one actor in a play or film, or as part of a theatrical or broadcast programme.
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Dialogue
Conversation between two or more people as a feature of a book, play, or film.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

A narrative folk song. Subjects for ballads include killings, feuds, important historical events, and rebellion.

Back

Ballad

Card 3

Front

A type of literature defined as a song or poem, written in elegiac couplets, that expresses sorrow or lamentation, usually for one who has died.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Poetry that does not rhyme or have a regular rhythm.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

(in verse) The continuation of a sentence without a pause beyond the end of a line, couplet, or stanza.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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