How was British society changed, 1890-1918?

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What problems did the poor face in the 1890's?
poor housing, low wages, unemployment, illness, irregular work and little help for the elderly, sick or unemployed
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Why did the Liberal Government introduce reforms in 1906?
To help those who needed it (people with poor housing, low wages, the unemployed, ill, people with irregular work or the sick or old)
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What were the attitudes to the poor in the nineteenth century?
Poverty was blamed on the individual, people were poor because they were lazy, wouldn't work or wasted their money. Politicians believed each individual was responsible for his or her own welfare.
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What research did Charles Booth collect?
he carried out research into poverty in London and published 'Life and Labour of the People in London' from 1889 to 1902
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What research did Seebohm Rowntree collect?
he studied poverty and its causes in York an published a report called 'Poverty: A Study of Town Life' in 1901
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What'd both Rowntree and Booth find out?
That 28-31% of the population lived around the poverty line. (unable to afford decent housing, food, clothing, health care or even a newspaper)
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What war was the Boer war?
1889
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What'd the Boer war prove?
As half of the recruits were unfit for service, it showed the government that many of them hadn't been fed properly as children so didn't grow well. Unless something was done, Britain wouldn't have a strong army to defend itself with.
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Who and how did the liberal politicians help the Liberal reforms become reality?
Winston Churchill and David Lloyd George strongly believed in reform. They thought that social reform would make people better off and a stronger country as a result.
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In 1906, why did the Liberals want to win the election?
The labour party had won the recent election with 29 seats, The liberals wanted to win over ordinary people with their reforms so they'd win the vote.
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What was the biggest influence for the Liberal Reforms?
The number of Labour MP's increased between 1906 to 1910 . This could say tat the main reason they brought in the reforms was because of competition from the Labour party
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What'd people aged over 70 receive from the reforms?
5s a week, or 7s 6d for a couple. It was paid for by the government
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How many good meals a day had children received by 1914?
150,000
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What changed for children from the reforms?
They became protected persons; parents who neglected or abused children would be persecuted immediately
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Where would children who committed crimes go?
Borstals
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How much did medical checks cost for children?
they were free
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How much sick pay would a worker receive?
7s 6d per week, it was funded by contributions from the worker, employer and government
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What was difficult about enforcing measures for children?
Borstals weren't better places for them to go than prisons
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When did medical treatment for children become free?
1912
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Whose responsibility was it to have good meals for children at school?
The schools, this meant that is wasn't compulsory
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Was 6s 6d enough for an average family?
no, unemployment pay ran out after 15 weeks
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What did the government do about making jobs secure?
nothing, jobs were very casual and short - term
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What were the arguments for female suffrage?
votes for women would improve life for all women, equal working conditions, better access to education. Many women were already involved in politics. women paid the same rates and taxes as men so they should be able to choose where their money goes.
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what were other arguments for suffrage?
Britain want a democracy if half of the population couldn't vote
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What arguments were there against womens suffrage?
Women and men had different responsibilities. men were suited to work and politics and women were suited to home and caring roles. Most women didn't want the vote or weren't interested in it. Women were irrational and wouldn't vote wisely.
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What other arguments were there against womens suffrage?
Gving the vote to women meant giving the vote to all men, some of whom weren't worthy of it. Women didn't fight in wars, so they shouldn't be able to vote for governments that might have to delayer war.
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How effective were the suffragists?
They built an organisation that by 1914 had over 400 branches and over 100,000 members. The membership was mainly made up of middle-class women, they were very good at creating propaganda, ran political campaigns
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How effective were the suffragists?
organised petitions, and wrote letters to MPs. they held large rallies
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were the suffragists an effective movement?
arguably, no because they failed to get the vote for women by 1914. however they did get the women's suffrage bills proposed to parliament several times between 1900 and 1914.
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When were the suffragettes founded?
in 1903 by Emmeline Pankhurst and her daughters, Sylvia and Chirstabel
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Why did the Liberal Government introduce reforms in 1906?

Back

To help those who needed it (people with poor housing, low wages, the unemployed, ill, people with irregular work or the sick or old)

Card 3

Front

What were the attitudes to the poor in the nineteenth century?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What research did Charles Booth collect?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What research did Seebohm Rowntree collect?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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