History: Crime and punishment (society, law and order in Roman Britain)

HideShow resource information
Before the Roman invasion of Britain, what was law and order like?
No central legal system, different Celtic tribes had separate laws. Druids were central to legal judgements.
1 of 22
How was Roman society organised?
Hierarchical and patriarchal.
2 of 22
Which people were at the top of society?
Wealthy men, property owners, officials.
3 of 22
Which group of people were at the bottom of society?
Slaves (owned by the wealthy).
4 of 22
How were Roman laws enforced in Roman Britain?
Through the strong central government and good system of communication, which allowed for laws to be put into effect across the country.
5 of 22
What was the Roman legal system and their principles based on: Religion or rationality?
Rationality.
6 of 22
Who had the power to make laws and enforce them?
The emperor and the Senate.
7 of 22
How did the Roman government make sure that the people of Britain knew the laws of the new government?
Roman laws were written down and displayed in town centres.
8 of 22
How long before the Roman invasion were these laws displayed in town centres?
500 years before the Roman invasion.
9 of 22
What were the 5 principles that Roman society believed in?
Right to know the law, right of the defendant to know the charges against them, right of innocence until proven guilty, right to present evidence, right to a fair trial.
10 of 22
Who dealt with important/major cases in Roman Britain?
The provincial governor (Britain was a province of the Roman empire).
11 of 22
Who dealt with minor cases in Roman Britain?
Officials (known as magistrates) in small, local courts.
12 of 22
Why was there no professional police force in Roman Britain?
The Roman government did not believe that large sums of money should be spent on a professional police force, or on punishing criminals.
13 of 22
What did the victim have to do if they felt that someone had committed a crime against them?
IF someone felt that someone had committed a crime against them (e.g robbery) they would have to take the suspect to the local centurion, who decided based on the evidence before them whether the case should go to court.
14 of 22
What else were victims often responsible for?
Collecting evidence and, sometimes, taking the suspect to court
15 of 22
What were the main types of crime in Roman Britain?
The most frequent types of crime were lesser ones against the person or property, such as small-scale theft, or the selling of underweight bread. Serious crimes such as burglary and street violence were also common.
16 of 22
What were the most serious crimes in Roman Britain?
Rebellion, or religious non-conformity.
17 of 22
Why were these crimes the most serious?
They threatened the authority of the government and the emperor.
18 of 22
What were the main punishments for minor crimes, such as petty theft, in Roman Britain?
Flogging, beating or financial penalties (e.g being forced to repay the cost of stolen or damaged goods).
19 of 22
What was the main punishment for major crimes such as mugging, in Roman Britain?
Amputation of limb(s).
20 of 22
What were the main punishments for more serious crimes, such as murder or arson, in Roman Britain?
Execution or exile (only available for the upper classes).
21 of 22
What were the main punishments for the most serious cries, such as rebellion, in Roman Britain?
Execution (by crucifixion or being thrown to the lions), or being forced to become a gladiator.
22 of 22

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

How was Roman society organised?

Back

Hierarchical and patriarchal.

Card 3

Front

Which people were at the top of society?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Which group of people were at the bottom of society?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

How were Roman laws enforced in Roman Britain?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar History resources:

See all History resources »See all Crime and punishment through time (OCR History A) resources »