Health and Disease

Diseases
They are a major cause of ill health and can be communicable or non-communicable.
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Communicable Diseases
They can spread between people or between animals and people. They can be caused by things like bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites. They're sometimes described as contagious or infectious diseases. Some examples are measles and malaria
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Non-Communicable Diseases
They can't be spread between people or between animals and people. They generally last for a long time and get worse slowly. Some examples are asthma, cancer and coronary heart disease.
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Other Factors That Affect Your Health
Whether or not you have a good, balanced diet. The stress you are under. Your life situation- e.g whether you have easy access to medicines or whether you have access to things that can prevent you getting ill, e.g healthy food, condoms.
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The Human Cost of Non-Communicable Diseases
Tens of millions of people around the world die from non-communicable diseases every year. People with these diseases may have a lower quality of life or a shorter lifespan, which affects the sufferers bu also their friends and family.
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The Financial Cost of Non-Communicable Diseases
The cost to the NHS and other health organisations of researching and treating diseases is huge. Families may have to adapt or move homes to help a family member. Also, if the family member dies or gives up work it reduces the family's income.
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Risk Factors
They are things that are linked to an increase in the likelihood that a person will develop a certain disease during their lifetime. They can be aspects of a person's lifestyle or the presence of certain substances in the environment or their body.
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Risk Factors for Non-Communicable Diseases
In developed countries, N-C diseases are more common as people generally have higher incomes and can buy high-fat food. People from deprived areas are more likely to smoke, have a poor diet and not exercise, meaning the instance of CVD etc is higher.
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Risk Factors that Cause a Disease Directly
Smoking directly causes CVD, lung disease and lung cancer. It damages the walls of the arteries and the cells in the lining of the lungs. It's thought that obesity can directly cause Type 2 diabetes by making the body less resistant to insulin.
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Risk Factors that Cause a Disease Directly Continued
Drinking too much alcohol can cause liver damage. It breaks down alcohol, but the reaction can break downs its cells. Too much alcohol can affect brain function; it can damage the nerve cells in the brain, causing the brain to lose volume.
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Pregnancy Risk Factors
Smoking when pregnant reduces the amount of oxygen the unborn baby receives, and it can cause lots of health problems. Alcohol can damage the baby's cells, affecting its development and causing a wide range of health issues.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

They can spread between people or between animals and people. They can be caused by things like bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites. They're sometimes described as contagious or infectious diseases. Some examples are measles and malaria

Back

Communicable Diseases

Card 3

Front

They can't be spread between people or between animals and people. They generally last for a long time and get worse slowly. Some examples are asthma, cancer and coronary heart disease.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Whether or not you have a good, balanced diet. The stress you are under. Your life situation- e.g whether you have easy access to medicines or whether you have access to things that can prevent you getting ill, e.g healthy food, condoms.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Tens of millions of people around the world die from non-communicable diseases every year. People with these diseases may have a lower quality of life or a shorter lifespan, which affects the sufferers bu also their friends and family.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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