Fast and Slow muscle fibres

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What is the role of phosphocreatine (PCr)?
It provides phosphate to make ATP.
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How does PCr form ATP?
ADP is phosphorylated using the phosphate from PCr. PCr is stored in cells and ATP-PCr system creates ATP v quickly.
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How long does PCr last?
Only a few seconds - so it's used for short bursts of vigorous excercise e.g. tennis serve.
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Characteristics of fast muscle fibres (1)
Contract very quickly and powerfully over a short duration of time. E.g. in biceps.
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Characteristics of fast muscle fibres (2)
Large store of PCr used to quickly generate ATP.
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Characteristics of fast muscle fibres (3)
High concentration of enzymes involved in anaerobic respiration.
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Characteristics of fast muscle fibres (4)
Thicker and more numerous myosin fibres.
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Characteristics of slow muscle fibres (1)
Contract more slowly and provide less powerful contractions over a longer period of time. E.g. weight-lifting.
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Characteristics of slow muscle fibres (2)
Large store of myoglobin (which stores oxygen).
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Characteristics of slow muscle fibres (3)
Rich supply of glycogen to provide source of energy and blood vessels to deliver O2 and glucose.
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Characteristics of slow muscle fibres (4)
Many mitochondria to produce ATP.
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Card 2

Front

How does PCr form ATP?

Back

ADP is phosphorylated using the phosphate from PCr. PCr is stored in cells and ATP-PCr system creates ATP v quickly.

Card 3

Front

How long does PCr last?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Characteristics of fast muscle fibres (1)

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Characteristics of fast muscle fibres (2)

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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