Energy and ATP

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What is ATP?
A nucleotide
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What type of macromolecule is ATP?
A phosphorylated macromolecule
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What is the name of the pentose sugar in the ATP macromolecule?
Ribose
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What is the nitrogenous base of ATP
Adenine (A)
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What is ATP broken down by?
ATP Hyrdolase
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What is ATP formed by?
ATP Synthase
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How much ATP does a cell typically hold?
A few second's worth (it is continuously made) (only released in small amounts)
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Why is ATP good as an immediate energy source?
Smaller; simple, single-step hydrolysis to break down unstable phosphate bonds (that repeal each other); more manageable energy source than glucose
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Why is ATP more manageable than glucose?
Its breakdown produces small amounts of energy (enough for its functions) without surplus energy
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Why are the phosphate bonds so easily broken?
It has a low activation energy; phosphate groups repel each other (3-) charge; ATP is unstable
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What is the stage of photosynthesis where the synthesis of ATP occurs?
Photophosphorylation
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What is the stage of respiration where the synthesis of ATP occurs?
Oxidative Phosphorylation
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What is substrate-level phosphorylation?
When a donor molecule transfers a phosphate group to ADP
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What are the 5 uses of ATP?
1. metabolic processes; 2. movement; 3. active transport; 4. secretion (formation of lysosomes); 5. activation of molecules (e.g glycolysis)
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Card 2

Front

What type of macromolecule is ATP?

Back

A phosphorylated macromolecule

Card 3

Front

What is the name of the pentose sugar in the ATP macromolecule?

Back

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Card 4

Front

What is the nitrogenous base of ATP

Back

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Card 5

Front

What is ATP broken down by?

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