Distribution of Organisms

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: joshd
  • Created on: 15-03-14 14:31
What is a habitat?
A habitat is the place where an organism lives.
1 of 33
What is the distribution of an organism?
The distribution of an organism is where an organism is found. (e.g, in a part of a playing field).
2 of 33
How can you can study the distribution of an organism?
To study the distribution of an organism, you can measure how common an organism is in two sample areas and compare them.
3 of 33
What are pooters for?
Pooters are for collecting ground insects.
4 of 33
What are pooters?
Pooters are jars that have rubber bungs sealing the top, and two tubes stuck through the bung.
5 of 33
How do you **** the insect into the jar?
You **** on the shorter tube, and put the end of the longer tube over an insect.
6 of 33
What do you do in the first sample area?
Crawl around for a few minutes sucking up as many insects as you can, (e.g, from around the base of a tree). Then, count the number of insects you've collected.
7 of 33
What do you do in the second sample area?
Do the same as you did in the first sample area in the second sample area and compare what you find. Spend the same amount of time sample in each area, and choose sample areas of a similar size.
8 of 33
What are pitfall traps?
Pitfall traps are steep-sided containers that are sunk in a hole in the ground. The top is partly open. They are used to investigate ground insects.
9 of 33
What do you do with pitfall traps? What happens? What do you do?
Leave the trap overnight in your first sample area. Insects that come along fall into the container and can't get out again, so you can count them.
10 of 33
What do you do after using a pitfall trap in your first sample area?
Then, set up a pitfall trap in your second sample area and compare what you find.
11 of 33
What is a sweep net?
A sweep net is a net lined with strong cloth for collecting insects, spiders, etc. from long grass.
12 of 33
How do you use a sweep net?
To use one, stand still in your first sample area and sweep the net once from left to right through the grass. Then quickly sweep the net up and turn the insects out into a container to count them.
13 of 33
What do you do after using a sweep net in your first sample area?
Repeat the sweep in your second sample area and compare the number of organisms you find.
14 of 33
What is a pond net?
A pond net is a net used for collecting insects, water snails, etc. from ponds and rivers.
15 of 33
How do you use a pond net?
To use one, stand in your first sample area and sweep the net along the bottom of the pond or river. Turn the net out into a white tray with a bit of water in to count the organisms you've caught.
16 of 33
What do you do after using a pond net in your first sample area?
Then sweep your pond net in your second sample area and compare what you find.
17 of 33
What is a quadrat?
A quadrat is a square frame enclosing a known area, e.g 1m2. Used to study the distribution of small organisms.
18 of 33
What do you do first with quadrats? (1)
Place a 1m2 quadrat on the ground at a random point within the first sample area.
19 of 33
How can you find pick an area with quadrats?(2)
Example: Divide the area into a grid and use a random number generator to pick coordinates. Otherwise, if all your samples are in one spot and everywhere else is different, the results you get won't be reproducible.
20 of 33
What do you do secondly with quadrats? (3)
Count all the organisms you're interested in within the quadrat.
21 of 33
What do you do thirdly with quadrats? (4)
Repeat steps 1 and 2 lots of times. The larger the sample size, the better.
22 of 33
What do you do fourthly with quadrats? (5)
Work out the mean number of organisms per quadrat within the first sample area.
23 of 33
What do you do fifthly with quadrats? (6)
Repeat steps 1 to 4 in the second sample area.
24 of 33
What do you do sixth with quadrats? Example? (7)
Compare the two means. (e.g, you might find 2 daisies per m2 in the shade, and 22 daisies per m2 in an open field).
25 of 33
How do you work out the population size of an organism in one sample area? (1)
1) Work out the mean number of organisms per m2. 2) Multiply the mean by the total area (in m2) of the habitat. 3) E.g, if the area of an open field is 800m2 and there are 22 daises per m2, size of daisy population = 22x800 = 17600
26 of 33
How do you find out how the distribution of an organism gradually changes across an area using a belt transect? (1)
1) Mark out a line in the area you want to study 2) Put a quadrat down at the start of the line and count your organisms
27 of 33
How do you find out how the distribution of an organism gradually changes across an area using a belt transect? (2)
3) Then, instead of picking a second sample area at random, you take samples by moving your quadrat along the line. (e.g, placing the quadrat at intervals of every 2m.)
28 of 33
What can you do if you find there's a difference in the distribution of organisms? Give an example (1)
You can investigate the environmental factors that might be causing it.(e.g, if you found that daisies were more common in one area than the other, you could measure the light intensity in both places.
29 of 33
What would you probably find with the light intensity? Explanation ? (2)
You'd probably find that the light is much brighter in the area with more daisies. One explanation could be that there are more daisies because you get more sunlight for photosynthesis.
30 of 33
How can you measure some environmental factors with a thermometer?
Use a thermometer to measure the temperature in different places.
31 of 33
How can you measure some environmental factors with a light sensor?
By using a light sensor, an electronic device, you can measure the light intensity.
32 of 33
How can you measure some environmental factors with indicator liquid?
You can measure soil pH using indicator liquid - a sample of the soil is mixed with an indicator liquid that changes colour depending on the pH. The colour is compared to a chart to find out the pH of the soil. Electronic pH monitors can also be used
33 of 33

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What is the distribution of an organism?

Back

The distribution of an organism is where an organism is found. (e.g, in a part of a playing field).

Card 3

Front

How can you can study the distribution of an organism?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What are pooters for?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What are pooters?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Biology resources:

See all Biology resources »See all Distribution of Organisms resources »