Caring Skills

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Observation
Collecting information about the clients by watching them e.g. watching a child's behaviour
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Social Perception
Being aware of a person's likely feelings, needs and intentions. This can be shown by: facial expressions, posture, tone of voice and what is actually said
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Working Alongside
Working in contact with a client either by doing what they are doing or by working on an activity in order to encourage them to join in
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Modelling
Observing and imitating the behaviour of another person. Carers can help clients to learn new things by demonstrating it to them
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Setting Challenges
Suggesting tasks or activities that will stimulate clients and help to improve their abilities, skills and self-confidence
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Communication
Not just talking to someone- it also means listening, allowing people to ask questions and giving answers, using reading and writing and non-verbal communication
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Encourgaing Adapative Behaviour
Encouragement includes rewarding adpative behaviour. Adaptive behaviour is behaviour that will increase the clients well-being.
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Showing Approval
Giving positive responses to the behaviour of the client- such as similing or praise or if appropriate a cuddle
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Physical Contact
Can be used to comfort a client who is anxious or upset as well as to show approval. Physical contact is most appropriate between people who know each other well and have built up trust
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Creating Trust
Acting in a way that the client is likely to judge the carer to be reliable e.g. by behaving consistently
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Gaining Compliance
Getting the client to to what is required. For example a nursery nurse trying to get the children to wash their hands
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Distraction
Often used in the management of temporary pain or anxiety. Distraction is a way of making the client focus their attention on something else rather than their pain. For example giving a child a teddy before they are going to get an injection
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Reducing Negative Feelings and Behaviours
Negative feelings; anxiety, sadness and anger can cause clients to be; self-harming, destructive and hostile. Care workers can help reduce negative feelings by the way they respond to the client
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Disengagement
Temporarily withdrawing from contact with the client. Useful if a client has become hostile but the carer should not storm out slamming doors but find an excuse to leave
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Being aware of a person's likely feelings, needs and intentions. This can be shown by: facial expressions, posture, tone of voice and what is actually said

Back

Social Perception

Card 3

Front

Working in contact with a client either by doing what they are doing or by working on an activity in order to encourage them to join in

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Observing and imitating the behaviour of another person. Carers can help clients to learn new things by demonstrating it to them

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Suggesting tasks or activities that will stimulate clients and help to improve their abilities, skills and self-confidence

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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