Breathing

Bronchus
TUbe that enters lung. Supported by tubes of cartilage.
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Heart
Pumps blood around body
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Diaphragm
Muscle moves upo and down causing air to rush in or out of lung
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Bronchioles
Tiny tubes in lungs carrying air down to the alveoli
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Alveoli
Allows gas exchange between lungs and the blood. Each is surrounded by a network of blood capillaries taking oxygen away
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Intercostal Muscles
Move rib cage up and down during breathing
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Ribs
Protect heart and lungs in the thorax from damage
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Rings of cartilage
Keep the trachea open and allow movement of neck
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Trachea
Carries air down to the lunges. Mucus here traps dirt and bacteria helping to keep lungs clean
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Breathing In
Intercostal muscles contract. Rib cage up and out. Diaphragm contracts and flattens. Chest size increases, pressure in lungs falls.
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Breathing Out
Intercostal muscles relax. RIb cage returns to normal. Diaphragm relaxes, pushing it up. Chest size decreases, pressure in lungs increases.
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Why does our breathing rate increase during exercise?
Our body produces waste CO2. By breathing more, it can be expelled. Extra oxygen is needed to breakdown glucose to release energy.
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Features of Alveoli
Folded - increases surface area. Thin walls - Speeds up diffusion, less distance to travel. Lots of them - increases surface area. Close to blood capillary-reduces diffusion distance.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Heart

Back

Pumps blood around body

Card 3

Front

Diaphragm

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Bronchioles

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Alveoli

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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