Biopsychology Evaluations

Localisation of Function in the Brain. Eval.1
Peterson et al.(1988), brain scans. Wernicke's area active during listening task, Broca's area active during listening task.
1 of 31
Localisation of Function in the Brain. Eval.2
1848 Gage. Had pole go through cheek and frontal lobe. After the accident he became rude and short tempered. Therefore, localisation.
2 of 31
Localisation of Function in the Brain. Eval.3
Doughterty et al.(2002).n=44 OCD patients. They underwent cingulotomy. After 32w, 1/3 were successful and 14% partially.
3 of 31
Localisation of Function in the Brain. Eval.4
The idea of plasticity contrasts localisation. e.g. Homolgulous areas.
4 of 31
Plasticity and Functional Recovery. Eval.1
Bezzola et.al(2012). Gave 40h of golf training to 40-60y. Results were increased neural efficiency, therefore plasticity stays with age contrary to previous beliefs.
5 of 31
Plasticity and Functional Recovery. Eval.2
Study showed increased time in education resulted in quicker neurorehabilitation.
6 of 31
Plasticity and Functional Recovery. Eval.3
Medina et al.(2007). Prolonged drug use use showed poorer cognitive functioning and an increased risk of dementia. Also 60-80% of amputees reported phantom limb syndrome.
7 of 31
Plasticity and Functional Recovery. Eval.4
Hubel and Wiesel (1963), sewed one eye of kittens shut. The area of the brain associated with the shut eye was still active processing information for the open eye. Increase's validity of plasticity.
8 of 31
Split-brain research into Hemispheric Lateralisation. Eval.1
Sperry's experiments used standardised/well controlled procedures. e.g. using blindfolds when there was a fixation point to cover the over eye.
9 of 31
Split-brain research into Hemispheric Lateralisation. Eval.2
Sperry's work was theoretical. Pucetti (1977) suggested that the 2 hemispheres are so functionally (2 minds) different that they work a form of duality. Others argued that they are one integrated system.
10 of 31
Split-brain research into Hemispheric Lateralisation. Eval.3
Sperry's research has found that the left hemisphere is the analyser and the right is the synthesiser.
11 of 31
Circadian Rhythms. Eval.1
Shift workers are 3x more likely to develop heart disease Knutson (2003), this may be due to difficulty adjusting to a new sleep/wake cycle.
12 of 31
Circadian Rhythms. Eval.2
Practical application to drug treatments. Baraldo (2008), there are certain peak times in the day and night where drugs are most affective
13 of 31
Circadian Rhythms. Eval.3
The use of case studies and small samples (like Siffre's cave study) means that it cannot be generalised to the wider population.
14 of 31
Infradian and Ultadian Rhythms. Eval.1
Synchrony has survival benefits, is newborns are cared for collectively then there is a higher chance of survival.
15 of 31
Infradian and Ultadian Rhythms. Eval.2
Schrank (2004), mating would become competitive so avoidance of synchrony would be the best evolutionary strategy.
16 of 31
Infradian and Ultadian Rhythms. Eval.3
Many factors (diet, exercise) change the menstrual cycle. self-report techniques, small samples and confounding variable are all reasons why research into this may not be accurate.
17 of 31
Infradian and Ultadian Rhythms. Eval.4
Trevathen et al.(1993) failed to find evidence of synchrony.
18 of 31
Infradian and Ultadian Rhythms. Eval.5
Dement and Kleitman (1957), n=9, caffeine and alcohol were controlled, EEG's. Found hat there was a high correlation with dreaming and REM sleep. Awoken during and just after REM had higher dream recall.
19 of 31
Endogenous Pacemakers and Exogenous Zeitgebers. Eval.1
Research has found numerous rhythms in many organs and cells.
20 of 31
Endogenous Pacemakers and Exogenous Zeitgebers. Eval.2
Damiola et al.(2000), changed feeding patterns in mice, ultered the rhythms in the liver for up to 12h SCN un affected
21 of 31
Endogenous Pacemakers and Exogenous Zeitgebers. Eval.3
Animal ethics.
22 of 31
Endogenous Pacemakers and Exogenous Zeitgebers. Eval.4
Miles et al.(1977), blind mans rhythm was 24.9h, he had to have sedatives at night and stimulants in the morning. Practical application.
23 of 31
Ways of Investigating the Brain fMRI. +ve
Doesn't use radiation, risk free, non invasive and high spatial resolution,
24 of 31
Ways of Investigating the Brain fMRI. -ve
Expensive, clean if still, 5s lag and cannot home in on individual neurons.
25 of 31
Ways of Investigating the Brain EEG. +ve
Diagnosis of epilepsy, sleep stages, high temporal resolution 1mils.
26 of 31
Ways of Investigating the Brain EEG. -ve
Generalised info, cannot pinpoint or distinguish.
27 of 31
Ways of Investigating the Brain ERP. +ve
High temporal resolution and shows precision for tasks.
28 of 31
Ways of Investigating the Brain ERP. -ve
Some of the background noice may still be present since it could be hard to identify.
29 of 31
Ways of Investigating the Brain Post-mortem examinations. +ve
Broca and Wernicke relied on them.
30 of 31
Ways of Investigating the Brain Post-mortem examinations. -ve
Causation issue and ethical issues such as informed consent.
31 of 31

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Localisation of Function in the Brain. Eval.2

Back

1848 Gage. Had pole go through cheek and frontal lobe. After the accident he became rude and short tempered. Therefore, localisation.

Card 3

Front

Localisation of Function in the Brain. Eval.3

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Localisation of Function in the Brain. Eval.4

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Plasticity and Functional Recovery. Eval.1

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »See all Biopsychology resources »