An Orator Defies Death Style Notes

respice
powerful imperative - an order for Antony to turn away from his current course of action
1 of 25
quaeso
direct personal plea - a plea for Antony to turn away from his present course of action
2 of 25
aliquando
indicates something overdue, almost too late
3 of 25
M. Antoni
Anthony is addressed directly by name. This is a direct address to the subject of the plea.
4 of 25
respice, quaeso, aliquando rem publicam, M. Antoni
everything in this first sentence is calculated to suggest a last desperate appeal. It is common rhetorical device to beg your opponent to think of the state and his family
5 of 25
rem publicam...M. Antoni
Juxtaposition, hinting at the bond between self and country which Cicero suggests Antony ought to have and never has had
6 of 25
quibus ortus sis, non quibuscum vivas considera
this section ends with another imperative to emphasise Cicero's jurisdiction. Phrases are balanced to stress the contrast
7 of 25
mecum ut voles
Cicero is putting himself at Antony's mercy. Note the precise tense usage in 'voles' - Cicero is thinking of the future not the present
8 of 25
redi cum re publica in gratiam
Cicero begs Antony to come back. Note the imperative 'redi' is brought forward to the beginning of the clause to reinforce the passion of the plea
9 of 25
sed de te tu videris. ego de me ipse profitebor
Cicero is comparing his own actions of when he was consul in 63BC to the way he is opposing Antony now, but suggests that Antony can be reconciled.
10 of 25
sed de te tu videris
The responsibility is placed on Antony and the examples of how he should behave is about to follow based on Cicero’s defining moment as consul in 63BC. 'videris' is a future perfect used as a polite imperative
11 of 25
defendi rem publicam adulescens, non deseram senex
Emphatic position of 'defendi' at the beginning and 'adulenscens' is left to the end of the clause for dramatic effect balancing out 'senex' which is positioned at the end. 'adulescens' Cicero is referring with justifiable pride to his earlier career
12 of 25
defendi rem publicam adulescens, non deseram senex: contempsi Catilinae gladios, non pertimescam tuos
Careful balance of these sentences - 'adulescens' & 'senex' both left to end of phrase thus balancing each other out - same for for 'gladios' & 'tuos' Repetition of act of bravery followed by negative clause showing he won't stand by
13 of 25
contempsi Catilinae gladios, non pertimescam tuos
Cicero returns to his favourite theme - the way he defeated the Catilinian conspiracy. 'contempsi' is brought forward for effect
14 of 25
si repraesentari morte mea libertas civitatis potest
'repraesentar' is a specialist word of the Roman business world meaning 'to secure by cash payment' - This metaphor implies Cicero would pay 'in cash' by his death for the restoration of liberty in Rome
15 of 25
hoc ipso in templo
although this speech was never delivered, Cicero intended on it being so in the temple of Concord
16 of 25
ut aliquando dolor populi Romani pariat quod iam diu parturit
Cicero stirs up emotions of patriotism by referring to the dolor (pain) of the Roman people and the repetition of the pariat/parturit also by intensifying the emotion with iam diu.
17 of 25
libertas
Cicero offers himself as a sacrifice for the freedom of the state
18 of 25
negavi posse mortem immaturam esse consulari, quanto verius nunc negabo seni?
His construction is long but balances nicely as consulari is contrasted with seni both placed at the end of the clause which places emphasis on it.
19 of 25
negavi posse mortem immaturam esse consulari
Cicero echoes his own words (Cat 4, 3)
20 of 25
patres conscripti
literally 'enrolled fathers' - formal address of members of the Senate (who were officially 'enrolled' by the censor) Direct address to the Senators reminds us to whom the speech is really being made
21 of 25
ut moriens populum Romanum liberum relinquam
Cicero goes on dramatically to claim that he doesn’t mind dying if he can leave Rome free.
22 of 25
mihi vero, patres conscripti, iam etiam optanda mors est
He places mihi at the very beginning of the sentence and uses a gerundive (optanda) to emphasize the necessity/intensity of his desire
23 of 25
prefuncto rebus eis quas adeptus sum quasque gessi
He mentions what he has done and how he has been honoured for those deeds, so therefore they should listen to him
24 of 25
duo modo haec opto, unum ut moriens populum Romanum liberum relinquam - hoc mihi maius ab dis immortalibus dari nihil potest - alterum ut ita cuique eveniat ut de republica quisque mereatur
In the final sentence he dramatically sets out his two desires: his death may bring freedom –liberum is left until late in the clause, and intensified by the approval of the gods, and second that everyone may meet his just deserts for what he's done
25 of 25

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

direct personal plea - a plea for Antony to turn away from his present course of action

Back

quaeso

Card 3

Front

indicates something overdue, almost too late

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Anthony is addressed directly by name. This is a direct address to the subject of the plea.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

everything in this first sentence is calculated to suggest a last desperate appeal. It is common rhetorical device to beg your opponent to think of the state and his family

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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