Paradise Lost Interpretations

  • Created by: Elmo
  • Created on: 12-05-17 14:28
Williams
"Adam's desires to follow his heart is heroic"
1 of 25
Bell
"Adam and Eve were already flawed"
2 of 25
Frye
"Adam's fall is surrendering the power to act"
3 of 25
Williams
"They did not like what they got, but that doesn't change the fact they got it"
4 of 25
Burden
"Adam, by permitting Eve to go forth alone creates the climate for her fall"
5 of 25
Burden
"Adam is the stronger of the pair, and since Eve was "designedly the weaker..." his is the greater share of the responsibility for choices made"
6 of 25
Bowers
"Eve's weaker reason falls victim to a more powerful passion"
7 of 25
de Beauvoir
"One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman"
8 of 25
Bierman
"Eve is not inferior to Adam upon creation, she is actually equal to him for she is made from the same flesh as he"
9 of 25
Berman
"Milton shows Eve's progression from an independent woman to a dependent woman to show that women are not born submissive"
10 of 25
Moore
"Despite the fact that Milton was constrained by hierarchical cultural assumptions about women and marriage, his Eve is in some respects a... female figure in the seventeenth century"
11 of 25
Luke
"Eve names the plants... Eve's special relationship with plants of the garden that we could understand why she is so vulnerable to temptation by a tree"
12 of 25
Tanimoto
"it places her on the same level with animals which are, like Eve, under Adam's government"
13 of 25
Gilbert and Gubar
"for women readers as well as Eve, to follow Satan is not to achieve liberty and equality with the male, but to be incorporated into another patriarchal hierarchy"
14 of 25
Samuel Johnson
"Milton's delight was to sport in the side regions of possibility; reality was a scene too narrow for his mind"
15 of 25
William Blake
"The reason Milton wrote in fetters when he wrote of Angels and God, and at liberty when of Devils and Hell, is because he was a true poet, and of the Devil's party without knowing it"
16 of 25
Coleridge
"the very height of poetic sublimity"
17 of 25
Shelley
"Nothing can exceed the energy and magnificence of the character of Satan as expressed in Paradise Lost... Milton's Devil as a moral being is... far superior to God"
18 of 25
T.S. Eliot
"Milton brought out the worst in me"
19 of 25
Margaret Drabble
"Sociable, good-natured, and increasingly serene...or a domestic tyrant, a strict Puritan, a misogynist, a libertine, and recently, as a radical heretic"
20 of 25
Gilbert and Gubar
"Milton's bogey cuts women off from the spaciousness of possibility"
21 of 25
Virginia Woolf (on Milton)
"He deals in horror and immensity and squalor and sublimity but never in the passions of the human heart"
22 of 25
Gilbert and Gubar
"Milton's bogey, whatever else it may be, is ultimately his cosmology, his vision of 'what men thought' and his powerful rendering of the culture myth that Woolf... sensed at the heart of Western literary patriarchy"
23 of 25
Gilbert and Gubar
"Frankenstein... in part a despairingly acquiescent 'misreading' of Paradise Lost, with Eve-Sin apparently exorcised from the story but really translated into the monster that Milton hints she is"
24 of 25
Gilbert and Gubar
"literary women, readers and writers alike, have long been 'confused' and intimidated by the patriarchal etiology that defines a solitary Father God as the only creator of all things"
25 of 25

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

"Adam and Eve were already flawed"

Back

Bell

Card 3

Front

"Adam's fall is surrendering the power to act"

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

"They did not like what they got, but that doesn't change the fact they got it"

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

"Adam, by permitting Eve to go forth alone creates the climate for her fall"

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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