Aggression in sport

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Define aggression
behaviour intended to harm another person physically or psychologically, outside the laws of the game
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What is instinct theory?
Aggression is built up and needs to be released, sport is used to channel and use it as a catharsis. It suggests aggression is innate and genetically inherited.
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What is fustration theory?
A performer becomes aggressive when the goal is blocked and this leads to frustration in the performer and eventually aggression. A drive theory in which increase in direct proportion. Fustration causes a drive to be agressive towards the source.
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What is cue arousal/agression cue hypothesis?
Incorperates learnign and arousal into explanation of aggressive behaviour. Suggests fustration increases arousal. This can be encouraged by the coach or fellow team mates, through praise and reward.There must be agressive cues present.
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What is social learning theory?
It suggests aggression is learnt by observation, e.g if we observe significant others perform bad acts we may be persuaded to copy. Instrinic feeling plays a role in aggression
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Strategies a coach can implement to reduce aggression of their performer?
- Encourage stress management techniques - discipline the individual appriopriatley - Praise and reward when required -role models performing better influencing younger individuals
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Card 2

Front

What is instinct theory?

Back

Aggression is built up and needs to be released, sport is used to channel and use it as a catharsis. It suggests aggression is innate and genetically inherited.

Card 3

Front

What is fustration theory?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is cue arousal/agression cue hypothesis?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What is social learning theory?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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