Aggression

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  • Created by: Natasha
  • Created on: 20-11-14 10:31
SLT
We learn the specifics of aggressive behaviour (form it takes, often enacted, the teargets toward which it is directed).
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Direct Reinforcement
Perosnally rewarded for behaviour- more likely to repeat it after.
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Vicarious Reinforcement
Learning about the conequences of aggressive behaviour by watching others being punished or rewarded.
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Mental representaion
Must occur for SLT to take place- it involves the child imagining themselves performing the aggressive behaviour they have observed.
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Self- efficacy
Confidence a child has in their ability to carry out aggressive actions. Thier confidence is higher if the behavour has been successful in the past.
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Deindividuation
Being transformed when part of a frowd, combination of anonymity and suggestibility mean that they have 'collective mnds'. Individual loses self- control and becomes capable to go against personal or social norms.
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Nature of deinidividuation
Psychologically- lowered self- evaluation and decreased concerns about evaluation of others. Normally repressed behaviour by personal/ social norms. Aroused when individuals join crowds. Targeted on anti- socail behaviour.
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Institutional aggression
An institution usually refers to an organisation or place of confinement with its own social roles where behaviour is normally restricted under the control of specific staff. Aggresion occurs within groups or between different institions.
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Importation model
Violence and aggression is imprted from the social world outside the prsion. Bring their own social histories and traits with them -not blank slate. Infuences their adoption to the prsion enviornment- intensified within fixed limits- pressure cooker.
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Deprivation model
Institition deprives the prisioner of personal freedom and individual rights. Agression is the product. Situational factors crowding, boredom and loss of prvacy, loss of autonomy. A response may be to rebel.
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Serotnin
Serotonin is thought to reduce aggression by inhibiting response to emotional stimuli that might lead to an aggressive response.
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Dopamine
Some evidence suggests that high levels of dopamine and aggressive behaviour are linked e.g. antipsychotics reduce dopamine activity in the brain have shown to reduce aggressive behaviour in violent delinquents.
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Testosterone
The male sex hormone is thought to influence aggression from young adulthood onwards due to its actions on brain areas involved in conrolling aggression.
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Cortisol
High levels of cortisol inhibit testosterone levels so inhibit aggression. Studies have reported low levels of cortisol in havitual violent offenders and in violent school-> low cortisol levels also plays an important role by increasing aggression.
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Card 2

Front

Perosnally rewarded for behaviour- more likely to repeat it after.

Back

Direct Reinforcement

Card 3

Front

Learning about the conequences of aggressive behaviour by watching others being punished or rewarded.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Must occur for SLT to take place- it involves the child imagining themselves performing the aggressive behaviour they have observed.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Confidence a child has in their ability to carry out aggressive actions. Thier confidence is higher if the behavour has been successful in the past.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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