Paper 1 Advanced Inorganic and Physical Chemistry

  • Created by: EllenPlay
  • Created on: 30-05-18 21:53
  • Topic 1: Atomic Structure and the Periodic Table
  • Topic 2: Bonding and Structure
  • Topic 3: Redox I
  • Topic 4: Inorganic Chemistry and the Periodic Table
  • Topic 5: Formulae, Equations and Amounts of Substance
  • Topic 8: Energetics I
  • Topic 10: Equilibrium I
  • Topic 11: Equilibrium II 
  • Topic 12: Acid-base Equilibria
  • Topic 13: Energetics II
  • Topic 14: Redox II
  • Topic 15: Transition Metals

Topic 1: Atomic Structure and the Periodic Table

Image result for know the relative mass and relative charge of protons, neutrons and electrons

  • Atom has protons and neutrons in the nucleus. Electrons around in vacant orbitals.
  • Atomic (proton) number:  number of protons found in the nucleus of an atom. 
  • Mass number: the total number of protons and neutrons in a nucleus.
  • In an atom electron number=atomic number, Number of Neutrons= Mass number-Atomic number
  • isotopes: atoms with same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons.
  • Relative isotopic mass: Weighted average mass of an isotope of an element relative to 1/12 th of an atom of C-12
  • Relative atomic mass: Weighted average mass of an element compared to 1/12th of an atom of C-12
  • Relative molecular mass: Weighted average mass of a molecule in comparison to 1/12th of a atom of C-12
  • Relative formula mass:A term used for the relative masses of ionic compounds or ions. The term is used to avoid the suggestion that their formula represents molecules. The formula mass is relative to the mass of 1/12th of an atom of carbon-12.
  • Calculated from the sum of all relative atomic masses of all atoms present.
  • The term ‘relative formula mass’ should be used for compounds with giant structures.
  • You need to be able to analyse and interpret data from mass spectrometry to calculate relative atomic mass from relative abundance of isotopes and vice versa.
  • M/Z ratio mass against charge ratio.
  • Chlorine produces more peaks due to isotopes 35/37
  • m/z value for the molecular ion, M+, giving the relative molecular mass of the molecule from the peak furthest to the right
  • .First ionisation energy: The amount of energy needed to remove 1 mole of electrons from one mole of its gaseous atoms. X –> X+ + e
  • Successive ionisation energies: Amount of energy needed to remove one mole of electrons from one mole of gaseous ions.
  • Ionisation energies are influenced by the number of protons (nuclear charge), the electron shielding and the electron sub-shell from which the electron is removed
  • General increase in first ionisation energy across a period- More protons being added and atomic radius is decreacing when sheilding is roughly constant. Therefore electrons held stronger; More electrons needed to remove one mole of electrons.
  • Decrease in first ionisation energy down a group although larger nuclear charge it is dramaticaly outweighd by the large increace in sheilding and increace in atomic radius meaning electrons held less tightly.
  • Electronic configuration developed from:
    • i) the fact that atomic emission spectra provide evidence for the existence of quantum shells (coloured spectrum analysis)
    • ii) the fact that successive ionisation energies provide evidence for the existence of quantum shells and the group to which the…

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Paper 1 Advanced Inorganic and Physical Chemistry

  • Created by: EllenPlay
  • Created on: 30-05-18 21:53
  • Topic 1: Atomic Structure and the Periodic Table
  • Topic 2: Bonding and Structure
  • Topic 3: Redox I
  • Topic 4: Inorganic Chemistry and the Periodic Table
  • Topic 5: Formulae, Equations and Amounts of Substance
  • Topic 8: Energetics I
  • Topic 10: Equilibrium I
  • Topic 11: Equilibrium II 
  • Topic 12: Acid-base Equilibria
  • Topic 13: Energetics II
  • Topic 14: Redox II
  • Topic 15: Transition Metals

Topic 1: Atomic Structure and the Periodic Table

Image result for know the relative mass and relative charge of protons, neutrons and electrons

  • Atom has protons and neutrons in the nucleus. Electrons around in vacant orbitals.
  • Atomic (proton) number:  number of protons found in the nucleus of an atom. 
  • Mass number: the total number of protons and neutrons in a nucleus.
  • In an atom electron number=atomic number, Number of Neutrons= Mass number-Atomic number
  • isotopes: atoms with same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons.
  • Relative isotopic mass: Weighted average mass of an isotope of an element relative to 1/12 th of an atom of C-12
  • Relative atomic mass: Weighted average mass of an element compared to 1/12th of an atom of C-12
  • Relative molecular mass: Weighted average mass of a molecule in comparison to 1/12th of a atom of C-12
  • Relative formula mass:A term used for the relative masses of ionic compounds or ions. The term is used to avoid the suggestion that their formula represents molecules. The formula mass is relative to the mass of 1/12th of an atom of carbon-12.
  • Calculated from the sum of all relative atomic masses of all atoms present.
  • The term ‘relative formula mass’ should be used for compounds with giant structures.
  • You need to be able to analyse and interpret data from mass spectrometry to calculate relative atomic mass from relative abundance of isotopes and vice versa.
  • M/Z ratio mass against charge ratio.
  • Chlorine produces more peaks due to isotopes 35/37
  • m/z value for the molecular ion, M+, giving the relative molecular mass of the molecule from the peak furthest to the right
  • .First ionisation energy: The amount of energy needed to remove 1 mole of electrons from one mole of its gaseous atoms. X –> X+ + e
  • Successive ionisation energies: Amount of energy needed to remove one mole of electrons from one mole of gaseous ions.
  • Ionisation energies are influenced by the number of protons (nuclear charge), the electron shielding and the electron sub-shell from which the electron is removed
  • General increase in first ionisation energy across a period- More protons being added and atomic radius is decreacing when sheilding is roughly constant. Therefore electrons held stronger; More electrons needed to remove one mole of electrons.
  • Decrease in first ionisation energy down a group although larger nuclear charge it is dramaticaly outweighd by the large increace in sheilding and increace in atomic radius meaning electrons held less tightly.
  • Electronic configuration developed from:
    • i) the fact that atomic emission spectra provide evidence for the existence of quantum shells (coloured spectrum analysis)
    • ii) the fact that successive ionisation energies provide evidence for the existence of quantum shells and the group to which the…

Comments

No comments have yet been made