Yeats poetry

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the stolen child

mingling hands and mingling glances the Irish are planning a revolution against the British rule. language: sibilance- whispers Repetition- enjambment acts as a signal postcolonial context: Irish: problems with the British Fenain rising comparisons: September: Romantic Irelands dead and gone it's with O'Leary in the grave. Easter 1916: the horse that comes from the road, the rider; the birds that range. leada and the swan: the theme of control from another a sudden blow: attack contrast has plosives rather than sibilance

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The stolen Child

'To and Fro we leap and chase the frothy bubbles, while the world is full of troubles' contrasts the idea of freedom internal rhyme- reflects uncertainty rhyming couplets- troubles and bubbles echo's Shakespeareans Macbeths witches gaining power 'full' contrasts the idea of freedom surrounded by water trapped by the british. structure: the enjambement from leap to and fro the comma after bubble- bubble burst postcolonial reading Context: Irish problems with the English comparisons September: for men were born to pray and save... add the half pence to the pence the cold heaven: rocked to and fro The wild swans at coole: 'nine and fifty swans'

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The stolen child

come away of human child to the waters and the wild with a faery hand in hand for the worlds more full of weeping than you can understand idea: human child is a metaphor for Ireland who is controlled by England. language: child- metaphor for Ireland Faery- metaphor for England weeping- onamatapiec repititon of hands rhyme hand understand rhyme child wild structure the in enacts the trapment surrounded by hands rhyming couplets replicate the idea of entrapment Post colonial view point context: home sickness when his family moved to Ireland comparisons: September 1913- geese metaphor for Ireland wild swans at coole: when I awake some day to find they have flown away easter 1916: the horse that comes from the road the rider; the birds that range

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September 1913

for men were born to pray and save the ambiguity of what should be saved language: pray: the control of religion the pun of the word pray rhyming couplets- save grave- contextual form: mocking tone William Blake context: the Dublin strike Robert emmet wolfe tonne Edward fitzgerald john O'Leary the cold heaven - religion 'I took all blame out of sense and reason

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September 1913

you've dried the marrow from the bone idea: the real heart of everything has been taken away. they are no longer a connected union language: plosives-disgust marrow-taking away the heart and the nutrients structure: imperfect rhyming couplets bone and gone- no harmony between the people. form: mocking tone Philosophy the husk and the kernel context:Dublin Strike contrasts from nine and fifty swans union I took all sense out of blame and reason- the core has gone consume my heart away; sick with desire and fastened dying animal- the true irish man is dying- plosives

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September 1913

add the half pence to the pence idea: shows tension between the classes language: plosive- anger spitting out the words half pence- emphasises their greed structure: half pence in the middle frames their greed rhyming couplet of sense and pence- money overthrows common sense form: ballad- sarcastic abab- shows an argument between the two sides pyscoanalysis- reading context: the Dublin strike comparisons: 'the broken wall, the burning roof and tower- destruction a terrible beauty is born- plosives rhyming couplets of fate and hate- irish airman hammered gold... to keep a drowsy emperor awake- lower class abused by upper

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The Cold heaven

I took all blame out of sense and reason idea: yeats wants to remove himself from religion amd focus on spiritualism language: sibilance- whisper-truth- enlightment structure and form: free- verse caesura at the end- realisation context: theosophical movement biblical allusions William Blake -enlightment second coming- mere anarchy.... drwoned- sibilance- objection ceasurea- not running smoothly you've dried.. form the bone- removes the kernel from the husk

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The cold heaven

ice burned juxtaposition of states language: oxymoron- oppoistes -I&E, M&L class, him and maud ice- soft placid c burned- plosive structure and form: free verse- chaos & confusion ccontext: theosophical club biblical allusions comparisons: a terrible...born- oxymoronic faery and child- juxtapose -ice and burned

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the cold heaven

the hot blood of youth the young are foolish language: plosives- spitting his words at them hot-fury blood-compassion - influence from their family structure and form: free verse- chaos context: yeats did not agree with the violence biblical allusions comparisons: I know... younger dreams- does not understand- plosives spitting- (-) allows the audience to imagine their dreams wherever green... utterly- don't compare to the true romantic heros

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Wild swans at coole

nine and fifty swans... for their hearts have not grown old idea: swans only have one partner for life - he is alone- swan is a metaphor for Maud. language: there ... old- contemplation if his heart has grown old nine.. swans- old English way of counting form: similar to a lyrical song or ballad of strong emotions context: Maud comparisons 'when age may as well have chilled his blood- lonely consume my heart away- seeks imortality

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Wild swans at coole

nine and fifty swans... for their hearts have not grown old idea: swans only have one partner for life - he is alone- swan is a metaphor for Maud. language: there ... old- contemplation if his heart has grown old nine.. swans- old English way of counting form: similar to a lyrical song or ballad of strong emotions context: Maud comparisons 'when age may as well have chilled his blood- lonely consume my heart away- seeks imortality

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The wild swans at Coole

the bell beat of their wings above my head maud is his muse (protectors of arts and science)- yeats needs her for his poetry language: bb plosive alliteration- sound of their wings - Maud is always there - sound enactment structure: head being last enacts its above his head form: abc rhyme scheme context: Maud Coole comparisons: leada and the swan- zeus Maud muse- Helen- maud - destructive for men brute blood- plosive alliteration your beauty... memories- bell beat= memory

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The Wild Swans at Coole

when I awake some day to find they have flown away idea swans are a constant metaphor for maud language: they- considering other women become enlightened away from her structure: enjambment opened his eyes- enlightened rehertorical question- doubt context: Maud, Coole, contrast in religion comparisons your small... beautiful- resentment does minaloushe...change- ability to play Yeats

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Broken dreams

your beauty can but leave among us... vauge memories nothing but memories, but in the grave all, all, shall be renewd idea: spiteful tine to Maud language: beauty- has gone repititon- memories and all- enacts memories structure: caesura- take a moment to recall Isolation of all- enacts it has been buried form: irregular- expectaions that we are unaware context:Maud compariosons: when... away- suspense - rush of memories the cold heaven- love crossed long ago- star crossed lovers r&j metaphor for maud and Yeats

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Broken Dreams

burdensome beauty idea- irritation language: plosive alliteration-pugnacious- spitting out her words in anger- emphasis form: irregular form: change context: maud Comparisons: bell beat brute blood plosive alliteration

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Broken Dreams

your small hands were not beautiful idea: petty insults language: hands- shut off to him structure: small hands contained in the sentence- shut off to him caesura- not open form: irregular- change unwanted context: Maud skeleton gaunt- poltical involvement

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The Fisherman

a man who does not exist a man who is but a dream idea: traditional irish men dying language: repetition- a certain man structure:- caesura- imagine the ideal form- rant Willa Cather comaprisons Romatic Irelands... gone wherever... utterly

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The Fisherman

the living men that I hate the dead man that I love idea: juxtaposition new vs old Ireland language: plural noun men shows his multiple dislike structure: the caesura- at the end of each line creates the idea Yeats is ranting form: unstopped consciousness Willa Cather context: Edmund John Synge compariosns those I fight .... love- love and hate... mouth piece you've dried... bone- disapproval

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The Fisherman

in grey Connemara clothes at dawn to cast his flies.. a wise and simple man idea: perfect language: grey- perfectly balanced in between dawn -new era symbol of Ireland form 1)a dream 2)a rant 3)unstopped by consciousness context: home spun tweed comparisons romantic... gone the hot... youth wherever green... utterly the ceremony... drowned honey... betrayed I know not... dreams all that... brave where dips the rocky highland of sluth wood in the lakee

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An irish air man

those I fight.... love idea- rejection of parotic reasons to go to war language: plosives- spitting the words is unsupport structure- chiastic design- juxtaposition form: tight structure- iambic pentametere- gives a dead man a voice context: Ireland in WW1 stotism philosophy comparison September heros I took all blame out of sense and reason- - goes against Ireland ice burned- juxtaposition

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an irish airman

in balance with this life, this death idea: opposites language: pehonetic rhyme of f and th in life and death shows how quickly they are connected structure: death at the end enactment caesura loosing certainty or life form dead man give a voice, tight ,epilogue context: Ireland in WW1, Robert Graves comparison: form, Sept: grave memory: blow SC: born Easter: born challenge life and death ice burned- opposites

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An Irish air man

the years that come seemed a waste of breath a waste of breath the years behind idea: relationship between Ireland and England- wasted effort language th sound enacts breathing possessing onamatapiec values- struggle structure almost chiastic- results cycliacal- no achievement ceausra- reader takes breath structure- enacts form: eulogy context: Ireland in WW1, Robert Gregory compariosns drank the wind-imagery of breathing , forced breath with death rhyme - broken dreams- juxtapose

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easter

wherever.... utterly...born idea: different Ireland language: terrible beauty- oxymoron, juxtaposition born- opposite to the intention followed by their deaths structure: repition at the end of each stanza form: becomes complex context: Easter rising comparisons Romatic.. gone- dislike of moden society hot blood of youth I know not what the younger dreams

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easter

the horse that comes from the road the rider; the birds that range idea: irish want to relase from control language: rider- metaphor for England- control, user horse- Ireland- driving force, oppressed, used birds- peasents- want freedom structure horse above rider- allowinf them not to opreess them. chariot analogy context: Easter 1916 comparisons: feary human leada swan

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The second coming

mere anarchy....drowned idea: corruption of WW1 language: tide- state of flux mere... losed- caged animal being released ceremony... war has killed religion ( enlightment) structure and form: semi colons first 4 lines-build tension -reveloution free verse- chaos paul schimmel context: after math of WW1 comparisons: to know they dreamed and are dead-corruption of fighting the beautiful... time- corruption of fighting

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The cat and the moon

does minaloushe know that his pupils will pass from change to change, and from round to creasent from creasent to round they change idea: uncertainty language: repititon of change-mutability rehetorical question- own ability to know what maud thinks of him minalouse= yeats moon= Maud structure- chiasmus- nothing is constant form: two sonnets stuck together context: minaloushe Maud comparisons those is fight... love - chiasmus broken dreams irregular from- chaos and change

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The cat and the moon

does minaloushe know that his pupils will pass from change to change, and from round to creasent from creasent to round they change idea: uncertainty language: repititon of change-mutability rehetorical question- own ability to know what maud thinks of him minalouse= yeats moon= Maud structure- chiasmus- nothing is constant form: two sonnets stuck together context: minaloushe Maud comparisons those is fight... love - chiasmus broken dreams irregular from- chaos and change

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among school children

o' chestnut tree, great rooted bloosomer idea: development of Ireland language chestnut tree-growth- manipulation conquer roots- independence bloosom development strength structure ceaura,- represents the roots and stabitity form:regular rhyme scheme context yeats as a senator comparisons the horse... range-freedom three parts of yeats work eralr nationalism- roots domination- tree aesthetic gyre- bloosom sean m donnell

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in memory

they convicted us of guilt bid me a strike a match and blow language: blow-plosive-destruction or spread- blowing out the match with the sound-speaker match before=innocent during=beautiful after= neither innocent or beautiful structure position of blow allows the idea it is blowing out to have more emphasis- ending the poem context the sisters comparisons: blow... plosive b caesura blown out-surprise the hose..range taking control horse- fire birds-blown p=out the ash

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leada and the swan

blow- plosive- emphasis on the suddenness her theighs caressed- ambiguity helpless..breast-no choice leada metaphor for Ireland or Maud or Yeats swan metaphor for England, yeats or maud brute blood plosive alliteration comined with the I ambic pentameter the irregular sentences and the ceaura create the effect of shock the irregular mete=re reflects gashping and throbbing from the **** feminist reading context: the story-women are destructive comparisons burdensome beauty they convicted... blow

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