Othello - Themes and Quotes

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  • Created by: Tomdell
  • Created on: 26-04-17 11:55

Race

"Even now, now, very now, an old black ram
Is tupping your white ewe. Arise, arise!
Awake the snorting citizens with the bell,
Or else the devil will make a grandsire of you" - Iago Act 1 Scene 1

"To fall in love with what she feared to look on!" - Brabantio Act 1 Scene 3

"Your son-in-law is far more fair than black" - Duke of Venice Act 1 Scene 3

"Her name, that was as fresh
As Dian's visage, is now begrimed and black
As mine own face." - Othello Act 3 Scene 3

"All my fond love thus do I blow to heaven.
'Tis gone.
Arise, black vengeance, from the hollow hell!" - Othello Act 3 Scene 3

"O, the more angel she, and you the blacker devil!" - Emilia Act 5 Scene 2

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Women

"Awake! What ho, Brabantio! Thieves, thieves! 

Look to your house, your daughter, and your bags!

Thieves, thieves!" - Iago

"Now will I question Cassio of Bianca,

A huswife that by selling her desires

Buys herself bread and clothes" - Iago

"I will not stay to offend you" - Desdemona

"But I do think it is their husbands' faults

If wives do fall. Say that they slack their duties,

And pour our treasures into foreign laps;

Or else break out in peevish jealousies,

Throwing restraint upon us. Or say they strike us,

Or scant our former having in despite." - Emilia

“Why do you speak so faintly? Are you not well?” - Desdemona 

“My noble Moor is true of mind and made of no such baseness” -Desdemona  

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Manipulation

"Look to her, Moor, if thou hast eyes to see.
She has deceived her father, and may thee" - Brabantio Act 1 Scene 3

"If I can fasten but one cup upon him
With that which he hath drunk tonight already,
He'll be as full of quarrel and offense
As my young mistress' dog" - Iago Act 2 Scene 3

"Othello: Was not that Cassio parted from my wife?
Iago: Cassio, my lord! No, sure, I cannot think it
That he would steal away so guiltylike,
Seeing you coming." - Iago & Othello Act 3 Scene 3

"Do it not with poison. Strangle her in her bed, 
even the bed she hath contaminated." - Iago Act 4 Scene 1

"I’ll pour this pestilence into his ear" - Iago Act 2 Scene 3 "

"The Moor is of a free and open nature, That thinks men honest that but seem to be so, And will as tenderly be led by the nose As asses are" - Iago Act 1 Scene 3

 

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Death

"Get me some poison, Iago, this night: I'll not
expostulate with her lest her body and beauty
unprovide my mind again. This night, Iago." - Othello Act 4 Scene 1

“In Aleppo once where a malignant and a turbaned Turk beat a venetian and traduced the state, I took by the throat the circumcised dog, and smote him thus (He stabs himself)” - Othello Act 5 Scene 2

“What noise is that? Not dead? Not yet quite dead? I that am cruel am yet merciful; I would not have thee linger in thy pain” Othello 

Ay, let her rot, and perish and be damned 
tonight, for she shall not live. - Othello Act 

 I'll not shed her blood; nor scar that whiter skin of hers than snow, and smooth as monumental alabaster. Yet she must die, else she'll betray more men. Othello Act 5 Scene 2

And yet I fear you; for you are fatal then when your eyes roll so: why I should fear I know not, since guiltiness I know not; but yet I feel I fear. - Desdemona Act 5 Scene 2

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