Brands & Logos

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  • Created by: cxxtlxn
  • Created on: 20-04-18 23:49

Baudrillard 1990

"Income, prestige purchases and surplus labour form a frantic vicious circle, the infernal round of consumption based on the celebration of the so-called 'psychological' needs. These are differentiated from 'physiological' needs by apparently being based on 'discretionary income' and freedom of choice; They can thus be ruthlessly manipulated"

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The System of Objects

Implies products and services are 'objects', are an oversimplification of how 'needs' are constructed in the marketplace

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Simmel (1980)

- Objectivity & subjectivity of products

  • Sheer number of products
  • Specialisation
  • Complexity

- Objective & subjective cultures are sometimes incongruous

- Basically we don't know how much stuff works

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System of Objects (Baudrillard 1970)

  • Marx linked production with consumer need 
  • Linked production with utility value
  • Does each object reflect a consumer need? Does each object have a utility value?
  • Baudrillard says not;

- System of Interrelated objects

- Created by the marketplace

- Imbued with abstract codes

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Sign Value

  • Consumed for social ends (Corrigan, 1997)
  • A cultural system of signs
  • Site of deep dependence
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'Abstract'

1. Existing in thought or as an idea but not having a physical/concrete existence. 

- "Abstract concepts such as love or beauty"

2. Relating to or denoting art that does not attempt to represent external reality, but rather seeks to achieve its effect using shapes, colours, and textures. 

- "Abstract pictures"

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Brand Positioning (Keller & Lehmann, 2006)

  • Celebrity endorsers (e.g. Michael Jackson).
  • Channel between brand and customer (I'm Tiger Woods)
  • Association with aspirational reference groups, lifestyles, cultural groups or class positions.
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Brand Intangibles

  • Forging strong brand associations
  • 'Fun'
  • 'Happy'
  • 'Historic
  • Imagery  transcends physical products
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Brand Personality

  • Judgement of features
  • Personality
  • The regard of human form or behaviour to object, deity, animal etc
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Brand Loyalty

  • The ability to engender feelings of affection and loyalty to particular brands as part of an on-going relationship.
  • Passion Brands (Edward & Day 2005
  • Brands with active belief
  • Brands with confidence
  • Brands with an instinctive feel for the zeitgeist
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Head or heart?

  • Emotions inform decision-making

- Groups

- Loyalty 

- Commitment

  • Marketers seek to elicit emotional response.
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Brand relationships

  • Long-term relationships w/ brands
  • Relational interaction
  • Psychological engagement
  • Customer satifaction
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Holt (2002)/Holt & Cameron (2009)

  • Traditional branding approaches fail to create icons; mostly; 
  • Why do some brands become icons and others don't?
  • Why do some brands lead culture and others don't? 
  • Why do some brands conquer red oceans with similar products?
  • How do we create the most appealing signs?
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What is an icon?

  • Powerful cultural symbol
  • Something people care about
  • Engenders strong brand loyalty
  • Has accumulated brand equity
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Target national contradictions

  • Don't target association with words or emotion
  • Identify deep-felt anxieties and tensions
  • Decipher  cultural contradictions experienced by a mass audience
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Create myths to lead culture

"unlike conventional branding, icons don't mimic pop culture; they lead it. They make charismatic visions of the world to make sense of confusing societal changes in much the same way as have Marilyn and Elvis, JFG and MLK, Ronald Reagan and Rambo, Steve Jobs and Bart Simpson"

  • Brands assume cultural power because they create myths to address contradictions
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Create myths to lead culture

"unlike conventional branding, icons don't mimic pop culture; they lead it. They make charismatic visions of the world to make sense of confusing societal changes in much the same way as have Marilyn and Elvis, JFG and MLK, Ronald Reagan and Rambo, Steve Jobs and Bart Simpson"

  • Brands assume cultural power because they create myths to address contradictions
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Speak with a Rebel's voice

  • Use the anti-consumer's voice
  • Rebels counter the orthodoxy
  • Authentic Voice
  • Provider of cultural opportunities
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Draw on political authority

  • Iconic brands engender loyalty as they provide solutions to life's difficulties

- "Well not at all, actually, but symbolically"

  • Myths may change over time
  • Yet iconic brands are looked on to respond to new cultural contradictions
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Cultural Knowledge

  • Mindshare?

- E.g. Fun, exciting, etc.

  • Cultural entrepeneurs 'cut through' in the system of object and signs.
  • BECAUSE! They understand consumer cultures
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