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Page 1

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Explain and illustrate two differences between primary and secondary
qualities. (15 marks)
Primary
quali+es
exist
independently
of
our
percep+ons
of
them.
They
belong
to
the

object
itself.
Secondary
quali+es
depend
for
their
existence
on
a
rela+on
between
the

object
and
us.

·
Primary
quali+es
are
objec+ve
and
can
be
measured…

Page 2

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Explain and illustrate two criticisms of idealism
- (15 marks)
Idealism
is
the
view
that
physical
objects
be
regarded
as
collec+ons
of
ideas/sense-data.

Expect
references
to
Berkeley.
Candidates
that
briefly
outline
idealism
should
be
rewarded

where
this
outline
func+ons
as
a
plaSorm
for
enhancing
the
quality
of
the
response.



·…

Page 3

Preview of page 3
`Sense data theories cause more problems than they solve.'
Assess whether this claim can be justified. (30 marks)
·
A
grasp
of
the
key
terms,
sense-data
and
a
theory
in
which
it

·
We
could
not
describe
something
as
a
representa+on
if
all
we
had
were

plays
a
role.
There…

Page 4

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Explain and illustrate two reasons for regarding form as
important in judging a work of art. (15 marks)
It
helps
us
to
concentrate/focus
aGen+on
on
quali+es
within
a
work
of
art.
Balance,

symmetry,
coherence,
order,
structure,
harmony
and
propor(on
may
be
used
to

illustrate.

·
Form
can
be
realised
differently…

Page 5

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`We value art because of the information it conveys.' Assess
the validity of this claim. (30 marks)
·
Historical
informa+on
is
useful
­
but
to
historians.

AO1
·
Priority
of
aesthe+c
judgements
should
be
in
the
direc+on
of
the
mode
of

·
There
should
be
a
grasp
of
what
could…

Page 6

Preview of page 6
Explain and illustrate one argument for distinguishing between
primary and secondary qualities.
·
Primary
quali+es
(eg
size,
shape,
mass,
density,
mo+on/rest)
are
mind-independent

proper+es
that
belong
to
the
object
itself.
Secondary
quali+es
are
the
sensible
quali+es

aGributed
to
the
object
(eg
colour,
smell,
sound,
texture,
taste)
and
depend
upon
our…

Page 7

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Consider whether the strengths of idealism
outweigh the weaknesses. (30 marks)
Possible
strengths:

·
Objects
really
are
as
they
appear,
so
idealism
reflects
common
sense.

·
No
need
to
propose
an
unobservable
mind-independent
reality
and
so
idealism

avoids
having
to
explain
how
we
come
to
know
.maGer.
and
how
it…

Page 8

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Explain and illustrate the notion of .form. in relation to
works of art. (15 marks)
·
Focusing
on
form
draws
aGen+on
to
quali+es
within
an
art
work,
such
as
balance,

propor+on,
structure,
harmony,
symmetry,
unity,
wholeness,
coherence.
Form

focuses
on
the
rela+ons
and
orderings
that
hold
between
different
elements

comprising…

Page 9

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.We value art because it expresses the artist.s feelings.. Consider what can be said
both for and against this view. (30 marks)
Against:

For:
·
It
is
not
obvious
that
all
the
art
we
value
is
emo+onally
expressive.

·
When
evalua+ng
art
we
oden
·
The
evalua+on
of
art
should…

Page 10

Preview of page 10
Explain and illustrate two the following arguments for the existence
of sense-data:
· illusion
· perceptual variation
· the time-lag argument
· scientific descriptions of reality. (15 marks)
An+cipate
the
following
kind
of
explana+on:

In
percep+on
I
see,
taste,
smell,
feel
or
hear
something.
That
sensed
something
is
not
necessarily…

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