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Of Mice and Men notes
by Max Kramer

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Index
Context
Author
The Depression
Migrant Workers
Ranch Hands


Characters
Lennie
George
Slim
Candy
Crooks
Carlson
Curley
Curley's Wife


Themes
Loneliness
Overview
Curley's Wife
Candy

Powerlessness
Fate
Animal Imagery
Chance
Dreams
Lennie
Curley's Wife
Curley
Candy
Crooks
Prejudice
Context
Lennie
Curley's Wife
Candy
Crooks

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Context
About the Author

John Steinbeck was born in Salinas, California in 1902. Although his family was
wealthy, he was interested in the lives of the farm labourers and spent time
working with them. He used his experiences as material for his writing.
He wrote a number of novels about…

Page 4

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Characters

Lennie Small

A migrant worker who is mentally handicapped, large, and very strong. He
depends on his friend George to give him advice and protect him in situations
he does not understand. His enormous strength and his pleasure in petting
soft animals are a dangerous combination. He shares the…

Page 5

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Carlson

The insensitive ranch hand who shoots Candy's dog. He owns a Luger, which
George later uses to mercifully kill Lennie.


Curley

The son of the ranch owner, Curley is a mean little guy who picks fights with
bigger guys like Lennie. He is recently married and extremely jealous of…

Page 6

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Loneliness
Overview

The way in which once all of the ranch hands have gone into town, Lennie,
Candy, and Curley's wife go into Crooks' room to find someone to talk to.

Crooks says, "A guy goes nuts if he ain't got nobody. Don't make no
difference who the guy is,…

Page 7

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The men on the ranch avoid her because of flirtatious personality to
keep out of trouble - they don't want to be under threat by Curley
All the characters are effected by loneliness, but no-one on the ranch
is able to understand why she is so badly effected by it…

Page 8

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Powerlessness
Although Lennie is physically strong and would therefore seem to represent
someone of power, the only power Lennie possesses is physical and
because of this he cannot stop his urges for touching fluffy things. Also, he
knows what it is to be good, and he doesn't want to be…

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Fate
Life's unpredictable nature is another subject that defines the human
condition. The title of the novel is taken from the poem of Robert Burns, "To
a Mouse On Turning Her Up in Her Nest with a Plow," November, 1785. Burns
wrote that "The best laid schemes o' mice and…

Page 10

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Dreams
Lennie
Lennie's death is symbolic that all good things coming to an end
George uses the dream to give them both hope for the future, once
word spread the other ranch workers wanted in too - demonstrates
the importance of dreams on a whole in the novella, and for…

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amina

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this is extrememly helpful, thanks! :)

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