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2) POWER
DESCRIBE: Curley apologises to Slim for questioning him about his wife.
POINT: in the scene we learn that Curley does not have power over all of the workers despite being
the boss' son.
CRISP:
CONTEXT: this is surprising; it would have been unusual for a farm worker to have had power over his
boss, because farm workers were normally migrants who had been forced to move to find work due to
the Great Depression and Dust Bowl, they did the jobs no one else wanted to do so were normally the
lowest of the low.
DESCRIBE: Carlson asks Curley why he doesn't make his wife stay at home where she belongs.
POINT: we learn that Curley does not have power over his wife and is unable to control her actions.
CRISP:
CONTEXT: this is surprising and would have been frowned upon during the time as women were not
viewed as equal to men, but instead as their husband's property. Curley should, therefore, have
complete control over his wife.
Also shows that Curley also does not have complete control over Carlson either, as Carlson is being
rude to him/questioning him.
DESCRIBE: Curley attacks Lennie because he think Lennie was laughing at him.
POINT: in the scene we learn that Curley uses violence to try and control the workers as he knows his
status as the bosses son does not mean he automatically have power over the workers, even though he
should really, so uses violence to gain power over the weak (he does not attack Carlson or Slim who
actually are rude to him).
CRISP:
DESCRIBE: Lennie breaks his hand during the fight.
POINT: in the scene we learn that Curley's physical power is also limited.
CRISP:…read more

Slide 3

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1) FRIENDSHIP
DESCRIBE: George tells Slim that they `look after' each other.
POINT: we learn that George and Lennie are friend, because they care about each other
so implies they are close either friends or family.
CRISP:
DESCRIBE: George tells Slim that Lennie is a `hell of a nice fella' even though he `ain't
bright.'
POINT: in the scene we learn that George is friends with Lennie despite the fact Lennie is
different; he is a really good friend.
CRISP:
DESCRIBE: Slim says that not many guys travel around together.
POINT: in the scene we learn that George and Lennie's friendship is unusual which is
further evidence of the strength of their friendship.
CONTEXT: this is surprising; it was unusual for people to travel together because the
Great Depression and Dust Bowl meant that men had to leave their friends and family in
order to find work. Also because there were so few jobs you would be more likely to find
one job than two (and even harder to find a job for someone with a disability), so it made
sense to travel alone.
CRISP:
DESCRIBE: he tells Slim it is much nicer to travel with someone than on your own.
POINT: we learn that George's friendship with Lennie makes him happy.
CRISP:…read more

Slide 4

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(2) Friendship
DESCRIBE: after killing Curley's wife Lennie goes and waits for George in the brush like he was told
to.
POINT: we learn that Lennie sees George as a friend, because Lennie trusts him and knows he will
protect him.
CRISP:
DESCRIBE: Lennie asks George if he is going to `give him hell' for killing Curley's wife.
POINT: we learn that George is a good friend because he cares about Lennie; he disciplines him for
his own good.
CRISP:
DESCRIBE: George does not tell Lennie that the ranch workers are coming to get him/that he is
going to shoot him, but instead tells him to turn around and talks about their dream.
POINT: we learnt that George is a good friend because he does not want to upset Lennie; is
protecting him like a parent would protect their child, this shows the extent of George's love for
Lennie.
CRISP:
DESCRIBE: George shoots Lennie, before Curley and the other workers can hurt him.
POINT: we learnt that George is a good friend because he is selfless; it would be really hard for
George to kill Lennie/he will have to live with his decision forever, but he does not care about
this/himself, just about Lennie and not upsetting/scaring him.
CRISP:
CONTEXT: this is surprising as itt was unusual for two people to have such a strong friendship during
this period, because the Great Depression and Dust Bowl meant that men had to leave their friends
and family in order to find work. Also because there were so few jobs you would be more likely to find
one job than two, so it made sense to travel alone.…read more

Slide 5

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(1) Outsiders
DESCRIBE: Lennie enjoys `petting' mice.
POINT: we learn that Lennie is different to other men because he is childlike. He does not enjoy
doing things the other men in the novel do like drinking or gambling, but instead likes playing with
animals, like a child plays with their toys. This is one reason why he would be an outsider.
CRISP:
DESCRIBE: Lennie describes how he accidently killed the mice he was given.
POINT: Lennie is also not like the other men in the novel because he can't control/does not
understand his actions. This suggests that Lennie has a mental disability, because he does not
understand the consequences of his actions. This also would explain why he is childlike, so Lennie is
an outsider because he has a mental disability.
CRISP:
DESCRIBE: in Weed Lennie grabbed hold of a girl's dress because it was soft, but she thought that
he was trying to attack her/rape her.
POINT: other characters find Lennie's behaviour scary. Lennie is therefore an outsider because he
lives in a society that does not accept or understand his mental disability.
CONTEXT: this is unsurprising as during this time people did not understand mental illness like they
do today. Normally people who had mental illnesses were locked away, so it was unusual to meet
someone like Lennie, this would explain why the girl was shocked/scared by his actions/did not
understand what he was doing, so assumed the worse.
CRISP:
DESCRIBE: Lennie and George had to flee Weed at night, in order to prevent Lennie from being
lynched.
POINT: people's ignorance meant that people who had mental illnesses were treated badly; if you
were an outsider life was uncertain, scary and dangerous.
CRISP:…read more

Slide 6

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2) Outsiders
1) Loneliness
DESCRIBE: Crooks lives in the harness room, not in the bunk house with the other workers.
POINT: we learn that outsiders, such as black men, were separated from the other workers so led a
lonely life.
CRISP:
CONTEXT: this is unsurprising as during the 1930s the USA was a segregated society, which meant
that black and white people lived separate lives (there were separate toilets, schools, cinemas, drinking
fountains, etc),
DESCRIBE: He tells Lennie that he is not allowed to play cards with the other workers because he is a
negroe.
POINT: being an outsider meant that Crooks' life was lonely, as he was not only forced to live on his
own, but was not allowed to socialise with the other workers.
CRISP:
DESCRIBE: he tells Lennie that George will eventually leave him.
POINT: we learn that Crooks believes all outsiders would eventually be left on their own; so being an
outsider has made Crooks become a bitter person, because he believes that George will eventually tire
of Lennie and abandon him. It also shows that Crooks isolation has made him a spiteful person, because
he enjoys telling Lennie that he will be abandoned by George.
CRISP:
DESCRIBE: Crooks says this is `just a nigger talking.'
POINT: Crooks knows that nobody cares about/listens to an outsider and shows that other characters
do not respect Crooks' opinion due to the colour of his skin, it also shows that Crooks is aware that no
matter what he cannot be equal due to his skin colour. This adds to Crooks' feeling of
abandonment/isolation.
CRISP:…read more

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