Pages in this set

Page 1

Preview of page 1

Page 2

Preview of page 2
Anomalistic psychology
This document contains three replacement spreads. If you view the pdf display two pages at a
time you will see them as one spread.
Replacement for pages 266-267
Changes to specification:
The psychology of deception and self-deception The role of coincidence and probability
judgments in anomalous experience
Explanations…

Page 3

Preview of page 3

Page 4

Preview of page 4

COINCIDENCE AND PROBABILITY JUDGEMENTS
At the beginning of this chapter we considered evidence for anomalous experiences. Now we are going to put aside
the question of whether anomalous experiences are real or not, and consider why some people have anomalous
experiences and beliefs whereas others do not. Two possible explanations…

Page 5

Preview of page 5
will persist as long as the occasionally patterns where none exist.
correct response has a large adaptive benefit.

PROBABILITY JUDGEMENTS
`Probability' refers to the likelihood of an event occurring, such as the likelihood that a horse will win a race or that a
coin will come down heads. Some people…

Page 6

Preview of page 6

Page 7

Preview of page 7
What is it that separates the sheep (believers) from the goats (nonbelievers)? Are they less intelligent? Are they
worse at probability judgements? Do they have flawed personalities? These questions are examined on this spread
and the following two spreads.

COMMENTARY
Illusion of control ­ A study by Whitson and Galinsky…

Page 8

Preview of page 8
· `Discuss the role of coincidence in anomalous beliefs'. (5 marks + 5 marks) representative of a theoretical
probability of 50:50 whereas other people expect short runs
· `Discuss the
role of to match theoretical probability. This is referred to as the gambler's fallacy, for example,
probability
judgements in believing…

Page 9

Preview of page 9

Comments

Emily

Report


thank you so much for posting this!! so useful

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »

Pages in this set

Page 1

Preview of page 1

Page 2

Preview of page 2
Anomalistic psychology
This document contains three replacement spreads. If you view the pdf display two pages at a
time you will see them as one spread.
Replacement for pages 266-267
Changes to specification:
The psychology of deception and self-deception The role of coincidence and probability
judgments in anomalous experience
Explanations…

Page 3

Preview of page 3

Page 4

Preview of page 4

COINCIDENCE AND PROBABILITY JUDGEMENTS
At the beginning of this chapter we considered evidence for anomalous experiences. Now we are going to put aside
the question of whether anomalous experiences are real or not, and consider why some people have anomalous
experiences and beliefs whereas others do not. Two possible explanations…

Page 5

Preview of page 5
will persist as long as the occasionally patterns where none exist.
correct response has a large adaptive benefit.

PROBABILITY JUDGEMENTS
`Probability' refers to the likelihood of an event occurring, such as the likelihood that a horse will win a race or that a
coin will come down heads. Some people…

Page 6

Preview of page 6

Page 7

Preview of page 7
What is it that separates the sheep (believers) from the goats (nonbelievers)? Are they less intelligent? Are they
worse at probability judgements? Do they have flawed personalities? These questions are examined on this spread
and the following two spreads.

COMMENTARY
Illusion of control ­ A study by Whitson and Galinsky…

Page 8

Preview of page 8
· `Discuss the role of coincidence in anomalous beliefs'. (5 marks + 5 marks) representative of a theoretical
probability of 50:50 whereas other people expect short runs
· `Discuss the
role of to match theoretical probability. This is referred to as the gambler's fallacy, for example,
probability
judgements in believing…

Page 9

Preview of page 9

Comments

Emily

Report


thank you so much for posting this!! so useful