William II and the Church

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  • William II and the Church
    • Ranulf Flambard
      • Flambard was initially the keeper of the royal seal under William I, and became a very important figure within WIlliam II's administration
      • Under William II, Flambard was responsible for bringing in all revenue required by the king. His methods were cruel and oppressive, and this contributed to a decreasing relationship with the church, especially when Flambard bought the bishopric of Durham for £1000
    • William's attitude to the church
      • As his father did, William requested the paying of a Geld from the church. However, he used this to fund battles instead of using it for infrastructure purposes like William. William used open bishoprics as a source of profit, selling them off, or giving them as a reward to friends. Out of 8 promotions made by William, six were close clerks
      • Overall, Williams attitude to the church
    • William of St Calais
      • William of St. Calais was a student of Bishop Odo, who provided much support to the crown. As such he was rewarded with the Bishopric of Durham
        • This trial was a particular important one. It set the tone for Williams relations with the church, and acted as a deterrent to opponents. It also showed that William would not treat the church like equals
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      • William recieved high positioning within the court of William II. However, Relations soon deteriorated when he was accused as being a member of the 1088 Rebellion organisers. Upon his return to Durham, he discovered that his lands had been confiscated and that he would stand trial
      • William opposed all attempts to try him, including up until his sentencing. He claimed that it was against the law for him to be tried under Secular and not Religious law, thus voiding the conviction. despite this, he was convicted and went to exile in normandy. He was allowed to return in 1091 during a period of forgiveness. His lands were restored and he sat in the court until his death in 1096
        • This trial was a particular important one. It set the tone for Williams relations with the church, and acted as a deterrent to opponents. It also showed that William would not treat the church like equals
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    • William and Anselm
      • Anselm was the Abbot of Bec, an extremely privileged position held by the top ranks of monks. At the end of 1093 the king became seriously ill and Anselm was invited to court, under the assumption that God was punishing WIlliam
      • Anselm was extremely opposed to taking the position. He wasn't happy with how the king was treating religion in England, and believed that the church in England was too corrupt
      • Due to his opposition to taking the open Archbishopric of Canterbury, Anselm was forced to take the position, being physically carried to the church. Although still opposed, he accepted that he had been selected for the position and had a chance to fix the corruption in the church in summer 1093.
        • Anselm set terms for taking the position. He wanted the churches property back, no tax, Recognition of Urban II and to be the only spiritual advisor. All of this was agreed with Rufus, before he sharply went back on his word
          • As such, the Council of Rockingham was called in 1095 to sort grievances. A truce was eventually agreed when William agreed to call for Anselm's Pallium, thus recognising Urban II as pope. This lasted until 1097 when Anselm went to the pope for help to sort the church. He entered into exile as a result, and remained in Normandy until 1100, after Rufus' death
    • William and the Monastery's
      • Despite WIlliam's opposition to religion during his reign, he did also actually help the monastery's to develop in England
      • During the Norman invasion, many monastery's and churches were damaged, so Rufus continued his father's policy of building new ones and renovating the damaged ones
        • BATTLE ABBEY
      • Furthermore, William fronted the money to bring over the Cluniac monks to form new groups of monks

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