To what extent did the NHS have an impact on the British Welfare State from 1919-1979

  • Created by: Vee Chan
  • Created on: 13-02-19 09:01
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  • To what extent did the NHS have an impact on the British Welfare State? 1919-1979
    • Interwar Healthcare
      • Friendly Societies
        • Small voluntary charities that provided healthcare
          • Unprofessional, unregulated, poor quality. If one fell under that often meant people in that area lost all possible healthcare.
          • Covered for people whom couldn't afford+ families, wives and children
      • National Insurance Act 1911
        • This provided free healthcare for workers and sick pay
      • Ministry of Health Created in 1919
        • Showed that Govt. was beginning to realise the need for healthcare.
        • Lacked political bearing and couldn't command authority. No radical change in this era.
      • Overall practice was a faliure but acted as the guidelines of what people wanted to avoid post ww2.
        • The Beveridge Report
          • Inspired by EMSA and from the faliure of healthcare in Interwar. Encouraged the need for a NHS
            • Direct cause for NHS creation. Labour promises and public support from this report.
    • World War 2
      • Emergency Medical Service Act 1939
        • Intent was for solely military care + temporary service.
        • Extended to civilians in contrast to intent.
          • Public perception of govt. intervention became positive
        • The Beveridge Report
          • Inspired by EMSA and from the faliure of healthcare in Interwar. Encouraged the need for a NHS
            • Direct cause for NHS creation. Labour promises and public support from this report.
      • Public perception of govt.intervention good. Positive view of free healthcare
    • The 1946 National Health Services Act (NHS Created)
      • Stuffing their mouths with gold
        • Feb 1948 Initially 90% of the BMA voted against working with the NHS. Promises of good pay led to 90% of doctors joining by July
          • Managed to help the NHS come to fruition. Experienced doctors to treat people
      • New Medical advances
        • Life expectancy increased.
          • Whooping Cough dropped by 90% post creation. TB fell from 25,000 cases to 5000 yearly.
        • More old age illnesses increased due to life expectancy. Increased costs to combat.
      • Great success in breaking away from healthcare issues of the interwar period and publicly supported. Though expensive.
      • Challenges for the NHS post 1945.
        • Labour expected costs to fall but instead GDP on NHS rose due to increased treatment costs, increase in staff and dependency
          • Led to charges on dentures and glasses,
            • Labour rift
        • The Pill and Kidney Transplants in the 60's/70's
          • The pill especially becoming widely used among the public meant more drug/ treatment costs
          • These innovations provided sexual safety and increased life expectancy.

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