The Second Reform Act

Just little notes without much detail about the 1867 Second Reform Act which enfranchised the lower middle class/urban workers. 

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  • The Second Reform Act
    • 1867
      • Around this time there was a cholera epidemic
      • Also an economic slump
        • Contributing factors (possible)
          • Around this time there was a cholera epidemic
    • Enfranchised part of the urban working class// 'respectable working men'//lower branch of the middle class
      • However, excluded the unskilled workers, the poor and of course women
    • Prior to Act, Palmerston was against any type of political change
      • His death in 1865, however, gave way to the opportunity of further reform
        • Liberals under Gladstone and Russell drew up the proposal to extend the vote
          • To boroughs with rateable worth £7 a year, and with counties £14, likely which 400,000 men of which the Reform League supported
            • The bill was thrown out though due to Conservative oppostion
              • But it was also aided by 40 Liberals who objected giving the 'ignorant' WC the right to vote
              • This caused Russell (PM at the time) to resign
                • It also caused the RL to demonstrate throughout the country
                  • Possibly because of the growing pressure from the WC, Lord Derby (part of the Conservatives which were not in office with a minority) to propose a new bill
                    • Alongside Disraeli in the Commons
                      • Idea of passing a 'less bill' as the 'lesser evil'
                    • The Conservative bill ended up being radicalized in order to show up the Liberals  + in order to show the CP as the party of the people
    • The Conservative bill ended up being radicalized in order to show up the Liberals  + in order to show the CP as the party of the people

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